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Wednesday, Feb 2, 2000
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Issue #94 :: Wednesday, February 2, 2000

Top Headlines

Federal Grand Jury Indicts Berkeley Landlord and Son
A Berkeley landlord and his son were indicted by a federal grand jury yesterday on nine counts of visa fraud and illegally importing Indian girls into the United States for sex, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California announced yesterday.

Don't Mention It
Covering crime for The Daily Californian was about the hardest thing I've ever had to do. Besides the fact that I was a freshman and still trying to organize a daily schedule around the D.C.'s open hours, I was having to spend hours a day talking to police officers (from two departments), rummaging through daily logs, and listening to a scanner whenever my editor was looking.

Clean Slate
In sports lore, Abner Doubleday invented baseball in 1839. The first professional leagues began forming during the 1870s. Cal fielded its first baseball team in 1892 and has been playing ever since.

Researchers Find Switch that Could Turn Green Algae into Gold
Green algae has a switch that can change its metabolic processes and produce hydrogen gas - potentially providing a renewable, clean fuel source, a group of U.S. Department of Energy-funded researchers have found.

News

Federal Grand Jury Indicts Berkeley Landlord and Son
A Berkeley landlord and his son were indicted by a federal grand jury yesterday on nine counts of visa fraud and illegally importing Indian girls into the United States for sex, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California announced yesterday.

New ASUC Bounty Program Leaves Out Greek Community
In launching a new program offering monetary incentives to student groups registering voters, the ASUC External Affairs Office has excluded certain groups of students.

School Board Examines Adult Classroom Options
After a plan to relocate the Berkeley Adult School faced stiff opposition, the school board tonight is expected to consider a proposal to build temporary classrooms on a middle school campus rather than relocate adult students.

Filmmaker Talks About Acting Workshop
A critically acclaimed filmmaker known for jump-starting theater in Taiwan spoke about his acting workshop yesterday, which students said will provide a major boost for local Asian American theater.

News in Brief: Haas Business School Hosts Competition
A business competition launched Monday by MBA candidates in the Haas Business School offers UC Berkeley students and alumni a chance to attract investors and win cash prizes.


Sports

Clean Slate
In sports lore, Abner Doubleday invented baseball in 1839. The first professional leagues began forming during the 1870s. Cal fielded its first baseball team in 1892 and has been playing ever since.

Baseball Travels To Santa Clara
With a week-long layoff and a win under its belt, the Cal baseball team is doing away with its preseason jitters and replacing them with pre-game anticipation.

Ducks Tie for Pac-10 Lead
Last week's biggest Pac-10 game was indicative of what the conference race should come down to this season.

Sports Briefs: Prep D.J. Williams Yet to Commit
Schools across the nation will announce their 2000 football recruiting classes today, but one name will likely remain conspicuously absent from their lists.


Arts & Entertainment

Case Closed
College plays, like college, are usually about melodrama, lost love, and the period of time when contemplation is a daily event. The new play ...closure, put on by Barestage Productions, is about all of these things and more. Thankfully, though, it is saved from being too adolescent by the pure energy put into the performances, particularly by the main character.

One Flashback Too Many
Cinematically as beautiful as its title, Snow Falling on Cedars translates from the bestselling David Guterson novel into the poetic elegance of Scott Hicks' visionary adaptation. This tale of love transcends time, culture and the irreparable wounds of war, yet clumsily handles the past and present in hopes of remaining faithful to the novel's structure.


Opinion

Don't Mention It
Covering crime for The Daily Californian was about the hardest thing I've ever had to do. Besides the fact that I was a freshman and still trying to organize a daily schedule around the D.C.'s open hours, I was having to spend hours a day talking to police officers (from two departments), rummaging through daily logs, and listening to a scanner whenever my editor was looking.

White Space