Issues

This Issue
Thursday, May 2, 2002
Next Issue
Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008
(SI:Spring Orientation)
Search this issue:

Issue #534 :: Thursday, May 2, 2002

Top Headlines

What Do We Want?
Berkeley is known for being a beacon of free speech, and as the center of protest for the entire country. Perhaps, in the 1960s, people actually gave a damn about what they were fighting for, but that spirit died a long time ago. Clearly, the average modern activist simply cares about having a good time.

Bid to Halt Racial Surveying in State Gains Momentum
UC Regent Ward Connerly's effort to end race-based classification in California has support from about half the voting population in the state, according to a recent field poll.

Baseball: Cal Readies Itself For Payback Against Card
Stick a footnote next to the line, "there's no crying in baseball," because there is-only it doesn't come in the form of tears.

‘Homebody/Kabul:' September 11 Affects Its Effect
Clocking in at 3 hours and 45 minutes, the play "Homebody/Kabul" lasts about as long as it would take to fly from one end of the war-ravaged country to another. Perhaps from an airplane, thousands of feet off the ground, a foreigner would get a better sense of what Afghanistan is like than one would from watching Tony Kushner's play, which sees its West Coast premiere at the Berkeley Rep.

News

UC Ordered to Help in Cleanup of Polluted Stege Marsh in Richmond
What many people do not realize when visiting scenic Stege Marsh in Richmond is it was declared a "toxic hot spot" by the Regional Water Quality Control Board in 1998-a title given to the 10 most-polluted regions in the Bay Area.

Five UC Berkeley Professors Awarded for Success in Teaching
Note to instructors: To make your students happy, teach them games and tell them family stories-it worked for Tyrone Hayes and Leslie Kurke, two professors honored Tuesday with the Distinguished Teacher Award.

Bid to Halt Racial Surveying in State Gains Momentum
UC Regent Ward Connerly's effort to end race-based classification in California has support from about half the voting population in the state, according to a recent field poll.

UC Berkeley Falls Short in Annual ‘Great Debate' Against Stanford
SAN FRANCISCO-Stanford recaptured the debate world's version of the Big Game's Axe last night, winning the fourth-annual UC Berkeley versus Stanford "Great Debate."

UC-Run Lab Searches for Director as Main Candidate Drops Out of Running
A leading candidate for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory director position has withdrawn his name from consideration because of controversy over his connection with exonerated spy suspect Wen Ho Lee.

Corrections
Tuesday's article "ASUC Bill Places Restrictions on Executive Office Stipend Allocation" should have quoted senator Puja Sarna as stating that "saying a stipend can be $4,000 or 5 percent encourages executives to pad their budgets," not "$4,000 or $5,000."


Sports

Baseball: Cal Readies Itself For Payback Against Card
Stick a footnote next to the line, "there's no crying in baseball," because there is-only it doesn't come in the form of tears.

Softball: Bears Looking to Heat Things Up Against Arizona, ASU
The first time you can call it an upset. The second time proves it was no fluke.

Women's Tennis: Brogan Builds Winners On and Off the Court
When Jan Brogan took the Cal women's tennis coaching job in 1978, the program had just entered Division 1 intercollegiate competition. The trophy shelves were bare and the program was relatively unknown outside of Berkeley.


Arts & Entertainment

‘Homebody/Kabul:' September 11 Affects Its Effect
Clocking in at 3 hours and 45 minutes, the play "Homebody/Kabul" lasts about as long as it would take to fly from one end of the war-ravaged country to another. Perhaps from an airplane, thousands of feet off the ground, a foreigner would get a better sense of what Afghanistan is like than one would from watching Tony Kushner's play, which sees its West Coast premiere at the Berkeley Rep.

Flowin': Academic Freestyle Session
Scholars and hip-hop-heads collided last week when UC Berkeley hosted its first Hip-Hop and Beyond academic conference, and it was often impossible to distinguish the two. As professor Cecil Brown said, "We call the performers scholars and the scholars performers here."

‘Visual Haiku' Dissemble Details From Askance Views
Nothing can really compare to having one's parietal lobe fondled by five hundred people. For those ingénues who have never been lucky enough to have had such an experience, "Visual Haiku," an art exhibition inspired by the neuroscientific explorations of Professor David Presti's MCB 61 class, presents the perfect opportunity for a nice neurobiological tickling.

The Borders That Bind Us: ‘El Rio'
In his play for an honors thesis in Ethnic Studies, Playwright and UC Berkeley senior Andrew Saito deviates from the norm of academic papers all-too typical of in UC Berkeley writing. He understands that one should not be limited-neither by a major nor the borders of an ethnic backgrounds.

Music Reviews
The 'gangsta' style has departed. At least it seems that way as the earth shifts under those old Chuck T's of gangsta rap, and more and more hip-hop artists are asserting their right to smile.

Band Review: The Beta
Scottish rock group, The Beta Band, rocked the Fillmore Tuesday night with their quirky, beautiful, sometimes cerebral techno/hip-hop flavored music. The band benefitted from playing in the fairly small Fillmore, performing more energetically than they did during their stint opening for Radiohead's 2001 tour.

White Space