Issues

Previous Issue
Friday, Apr 15, 2011
This Issue
Monday, Apr 18, 2011
Next Issue
Tuesday, Apr 19, 2011
Search this issue:

Issue #2643 :: Monday, April 18, 2011

Issue #2643 Cover

Top Headlines

Campus admits more out-of-state, international students
Out-of-state and international student admissions to UC Berkeley increased while California resident admissions decreased for the 2011-12 academic year, according to UC admissions data released this morning.

Campus divisions to draw on reserve funds
As UC Berkeley administrators work to plan next year's campus budget, leaders of various campus divisions will be drawing on reserve funds and savings from department restructuring under Operational Excellence in order to bridge a gap of over $100 million.

The Long Goodbye
David Foster Wallace - writer of fiction and non-fiction - is widely known for the novel "Infinite Jest" (which in and of itself is noted for its large size, extensive use of endnotes and discursive, hyper-literate and reflexive prose writing style), and for his 2008 suicide. "The Pale King" is his final - unfinished - novel.

Anderson puts down Huskies
Last June, Dixon Anderson was drafted in the sixth round by the Baltimore Orioles. On Sunday, as he stood on the mound for the No. 16 Cal baseball team, he must have remembered why he rejected big money for a chance at another go-round with the Bears.

News

Thousands flock to Marina for Bay Festival Gallery Video
Thousands of Berkeley residents and visitors from throughout the East Bay and beyond poured into the Shorebird Park at the Berkeley Marina for the Bay Festival on Saturday.

Campus divisions to draw on reserve funds
As UC Berkeley administrators work to plan next year's campus budget, leaders of various campus divisions will be drawing on reserve funds and savings from department restructuring under Operational Excellence in order to bridge a gap of over $100 million.

Expiration of contract to open options
With UC Berkeley's current beverage contract with Coca-Cola Co. set to expire Aug. 3, campus negotiators will be meeting to decide what course to take.

Students color black-and-white world Gallery Video
Despite the dawning of a grey day, about 1,500 people gathered to celebrate the Hindu holiday of Holi on UC Berkeley's Lower Sproul Plaza Sunday by being painted in spatterings of rainbow powder, getting wet and dancing the day away.

Renovation plans may be delayed more
After several months of delays due to a lawsuit and landmark proposals, plans to demolish the South and West branches of the Berkeley Public Library were approved at the Zoning Adjustments Board meeting Thursday night, though concerns about the legality of the demolitions could prolong the process further.

State office proposes changes for UC
With an already existing drop in state funding that has led to increased student tuition for state universities, the state Legislative Analyst's Office released a report April 14 proposing that faculty be less involved in research and that UC tuition rise by 7 percent.

Pub reopens with new name, new flavor
After a little over a month of peace and quiet at the former Beckett's Irish Pub & Restaurant in Downtown Berkeley, the restaurant nestled between Angeline's Louisiana Kitchen and the Used Computer Store reopened as BEC's Bar & Bistro Entertainment and was full of conversation, music and laughter Friday as community members celebrated the grand opening of the restaurant.

CALPIRG strips to expose issues with cuts
Appearing naked behind poster board signs, members of UC Berkeley's CALPIRG chapter drew attention during Cal Day Saturday as they encouraged people to call Gov. Jerry Brown, hoping to raise awareness of state budget cuts to higher education.

Campus faculty member plans to visit North Korea
UC Berkeley faculty member in the Department of Political Science, Darren Zook, recently obtained permission to travel to North Korea for the second time. The Daily Californian reporter Courtney Moulds had the opportunity to speak with him over the phone about his plans for the trip if he is able to get the approval and funding to go.

Owner of Serendipity Books dies at 72
Both a huge Giants fan and a giant in his own field, Serendipity Books founder and owner Peter Howard died of pancreatic cancer in his home on March 31. He was 72.

Campus admits more out-of-state, international students
Out-of-state and international student admissions to UC Berkeley increased while California resident admissions decreased for the 2011-12 academic year, according to UC admissions data released this morning.


Sports

Bears lose to Denver but win spot in MPSF tourney
The Cal lacrosse team did not get what it wanted on Saturday.

Anderson puts down Huskies
Last June, Dixon Anderson was drafted in the sixth round by the Baltimore Orioles. On Sunday, as he stood on the mound for the No. 16 Cal baseball team, he must have remembered why he rejected big money for a chance at another go-round with the Bears.

Bears get hat trick from Coleman, slug Santa Cruz
When people speak of the New York native on the Cal rugby team, sophomore Seamus Kelly's name is usually on their lips.

Henderson's dominant weekend helps Bears sweep visiting Ducks
No matter how many pitchers Oregon softball coach Mike White threw into the circle, the No. 17 Ducks could not stop No. 13 Cal from sweeping the three-game series this weekend - especially considering who was on the rubber for the Bears.

Disastrous first quarter dooms Bears in Big Splash
Stanford's message at Spieker Aquatics Complex was loud and clear.

Juricova shines but Card drops Cal Video
After misplacing an easy shot during the second set on Saturday, Jana Juricova threw her racket to the floor. Normally calm and collected, the No. 1 player in the country cracked for a split second during her underachieving performance at the Big Slam.

Bears' season, program ends with fourth place at NCAAs
After some inconsistent results early on this season, the No. 3 Cal men's gymnastics was ready to finish strong and produce the desired end result at the NCAA Championships.


Arts & Entertainment

The Long Goodbye
David Foster Wallace - writer of fiction and non-fiction - is widely known for the novel "Infinite Jest" (which in and of itself is noted for its large size, extensive use of endnotes and discursive, hyper-literate and reflexive prose writing style), and for his 2008 suicide. "The Pale King" is his final - unfinished - novel.

Sarah Silverman combines comic and crude charm at Zellerbach
According to Chelsea Peretti, the comic who opened for Sarah Silverman at Zellerbach Auditorium last Monday, friendship is a boring conversation you have while looking someone in the eye. Held to this standard, the stand-up comic is definitely not your friend. The relationship between comic and audience is a bit odd: The latter barters money for laughter, presented in a pre-packaged "spontaneous" form. Peretti, who has written for the Village Voice and guest-starred on "The Sarah Silverman Program," presented a strong personality onstage, but never seemed to win the audience's trust: The personality was too honed to achieve that spontaneity, too well-rehearsed to be charming.

Jean-Paul Sartre's 'No Exit' traps audiences in interactive hell
Sitting through American Conservatory Theater's latest offering is like sitting through hell. Fortunately, this is "No Exit," and that's the whole point. This classic existentialist play by Jean-Paul Sartre depicts the author's dark vision of the underworld. And this production, created by the Virtual Stage and Electric Company Theatre, is a little more hellish than most (in a very good way).

A raging Titus Andronicus strike the right chord
Titus Andronicus is a band with one foot in the past and the other on your throat. On their debut album The Airing of the Grievances, they combined hard-charging, whiskey-soaked punk with history-wonk references to postwar existentialism and 16th-century Flemish printmaker Pieter Brueghel. Their stunning 2010 concept album, The Monitor, was an elaborate extended metaphor, using the American Civil War as a thematic stand-in for contemporary self-loathing and rage.

New Release: THE INFINITE MUSIC OF FRENCH HORN REBELLION
It all started with a French horn for Robert Perlick-Molinari. After leaving his spot as first chair French horn player in the Northwestern University Symphony Orchestra, he and his brother David, a computer sound engineer, created the synth-pop duo, French Horn Rebellion. Currently touring with Yelle, they just released their debut LP, The Infinite Music of French Horn Rebellion, and as promised in the name of their album, the music is indeed infinite.

New Release: TOMBOY
Judging from the first two tracks, Panda Bear's Tomboy sets high expectations. But to listen to the Lisbon-based musician, whose signature sound recalls that of the Beach Boys (a reference so many reviews of the artist find difficult to escape) is to inevitably compare Noah Lennox's latest work with his previous releases. Whereas the artist's last album utilized repetition with intent to massage, Tomboy indulges in a lackluster reiteration to the point of regurgitation.

White Space