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Issue #2581 :: Monday, January 24, 2011

Issue #2581 Cover

Top Headlines

Ludwig Leaving Cal for OC Position at San Diego St.
Few will mourn the end of the Ludwig Era.

Better Communication Resolves Eviction Issue
UC Berkeley student parents are no longer facing eviction notices due to delayed financial aid allocations thanks to improved communications between the Financial Aid Office and Cal Housing.

UC Reaches Record-High Numbers in Applicants Podcast
Amid growing concern that the state's declining funding for higher education and recently proposed cuts to the university will limit enrollment, the University of California received a record number of applications for next fall, with multiple campuses achieving milestones in terms of out-of-state, transfer and international applicants.

Mo Money Mo Problems
Everyone likes a good story; a well-told, funny tale can break the ice in the most frigid social situations. Fortunately for the East Bay, monologist Mike Daisey is a master storyteller, and if you enjoy/respect stories and their tellers then "The Last Cargo Cult" is well worth a trip to Berkeley Repertory Theater.

News

Better Communication Resolves Eviction Issue
UC Berkeley student parents are no longer facing eviction notices due to delayed financial aid allocations thanks to improved communications between the Financial Aid Office and Cal Housing.

Local Artists Find Inspiration in Trash
Suzanne Husky spent the last four months rummaging through the trash.

Bone Marrow Donor Drive Reaches Out On Campus
When Sonia Rai, 24, was diagnosed in early December with acute myelogenous leukemia, an aggressive cancer that would require her to have a bone marrow transplant as soon as she was in remission, her family knew that they had to act quickly to find a donor.

UC Reaches Record-High Numbers in Applicants Podcast
Amid growing concern that the state's declining funding for higher education and recently proposed cuts to the university will limit enrollment, the University of California received a record number of applications for next fall, with multiple campuses achieving milestones in terms of out-of-state, transfer and international applicants.

Owner Saves Historic Cafe From Closure With Changes
Buying a cup of coffee at Caffe Mediterraneum on Telegraph Avenue means stepping into a piece of Berkeley's cultural history, representing an exchange of ideas and experiences across age and socioeconomic barriers.

Foreign Affairs Reporter Dies at Age 88
Former Washington Post foreign correspondent, author of 17 books and former writer for The Daily Californian, Dan Kurzman, died Dec. 12 at the age of 88 in Manhattan. According to The New York Times, he died of pneumonia following cancer treatments.

Boom in Yoga Fusion Classes Attracts Attention
Reaching her hands above her head and lifting her left foot to her right knee, Christiane Crawford looked to an old pine as she coaxed her class into the tree pose.

News in Brief: Despite Neighbors' Worries, Judge Allows Construction
After a contentious Dec. 2 hearing, Alameda Superior Court Judge Frank Roesch has ruled in favor of Mitch Kapor and the city of Berkeley regarding the software mogul's proposed 10,000 square-foot construction at 2707 Rose St. in North Berkeley.


Sports

UCLA Makes Free Throws Late to Halt Cal Rally Video
Going into Saturday's tilt against defensive-minded UCLA, the Cal women's basketball team probably figured turnovers would be key against the press. It turns out free throws made the difference.

Bears' Bigs Outduel Trojans' Post in Cal Win
LOS ANGELES - David Bowie and Queen's "Under Pressure" blared from the speakers and the USC student section chanted "Choke! Choke! Choke!" as Cal players stood at the free throw line with three different opportunities to put the game out of reach. Free throws clanked off the front rim, rattled in and out of the hoop and the Cal men's basketball team looked destined to blow a game it had firmly in tow with just 30 seconds remaining.

Cal Backups Hang 35 on Chico St. in Second Half Of 90-Point 'Home' Win
SAN FRANCISCO - The Cal rugby team looked like a completely different squad in the second half of Saturday's match. That's because it was.

Cal's Juricova, Andersson Net Doubles Crown In Final Tune Up
The Cal Winter Invitational can be thought of as the Welcome Week for the Cal women's tennis team - wedged in between the calm December offseason and the grind of the dual season in the spring, it is a time for practice without the pressure of record books or Pac-10 standings.

Suleman Jumps Over 50 Feet But Falls Just Short in Season Opener
The Cal track and field team jumped out to a promising start to the season in the Cherry and Silver Invitational held in New Mexico this weekend. Then it jumped again and one last time for good measure.

Cal Sweeps Arizona Schools in Surprisingly Lopsided Results
The Cal men's swimming team was expected to get their first real taste of highly contested competition in a pair of conference dual meets this weekend.

Cal Completes Hat Trick During Busy Season Opening Weeknd
The Cal women's water polo team opened its season with three games in two days, each of them more one-sided than the last.

Sports in Brief
Gymnastics Squads Drop Road Dual Meets Against Stanford, Washington

Ludwig Leaving Cal for OC Position at San Diego St.
Few will mourn the end of the Ludwig Era.


Arts & Entertainment

Do the Riot Thing
If being serenaded by a soothing blend of virtuosic string work and dynamic rhythms sounds appealing, then seeing Ra Ra Riot live is your dream come true. The New York-bred sextet succeed in their incorporation of both rock and classical elements through their music and make for an awe-inspiring concert. Working their magic under the soft lights of the ornately decorated Great American Music Hall, Ra Ra Riot charmed the crowd with a frenzied yet graceful expression of their emotionally charged set list.

Mo Money Mo Problems
Everyone likes a good story; a well-told, funny tale can break the ice in the most frigid social situations. Fortunately for the East Bay, monologist Mike Daisey is a master storyteller, and if you enjoy/respect stories and their tellers then "The Last Cargo Cult" is well worth a trip to Berkeley Repertory Theater.

Open Spaces
Standing before an intimate audience at UC Berkeley's Institute of East Asian Studies, Taiwanese playwright Stan Lai waxed metaphorical. "The deepest, most reverberating moment combusts organically, bobbling in a natural wave to interact with all the components at inevitable points in time," he said, shifting his weight slightly onto the lectern. He paused for effect, a hint of genial mischief in his voice. "Often when the magic happens, you don't see it. But it's right in front of your eyes."

Welcome to Heartbreak
Playwright Eugene Ionesco wrote that boredom is a "symptom of security." For the characters of George Bernard Shaw's 1919 play "Heartbreak House," now opening the 2011 season of the Actors Ensemble of Berkeley, boredom is a symptom worth curing with war. Set on the eve of World War I, "Heartbreak House" deals with a collection of characters, and a whole society, to whom even bloodshed seems a welcome break from the tedium of everyday life. Unfortunately this compelling theme does not reveal itself until the end of three hours' worth of old-fashioned navel-gazing.

Book Review: The Hustle
Race, class and education take center stage in Doug Merlino's "The Hustle," a true account chronicling the "social experiment" in 1980s Seattle that brought poor inner-city blacks with upper-class whites into one basketball team. Pegged on the squad were the hopes that poorer players might gain entry into better schools, and that the sheltered, prep school kids might be exposed to the city's other half. With the team winning the league championship, the experiment seemed to extol the virtuosity of integration.

Deerhoof: DEERHOOF VS. EVIL Podcast
SF-based band Deerhoof have cornered their own market: No one else specializes in both alienating and intriguing an audience as much as this indie-pop quartet. Like any other experimental band, they've managed to create their own standards, pique curiosity and resist any labels imposed upon them.

Cold War Kids: MINE IS YOURS Podcast
Sometimes the least accessible albums are the best ones. In essence, that is what makes Cold War Kids so appealing. There is something inherently rewarding about patiently discovering their music's hidden brilliance. You can't help but be pulled in to the depiction of alcoholism in 2006's "We Used to Vacation" or the vivid imagery of "Hang Me Up to Dry." But their latest work is a disappointment. Mine Is Yours unveils a new CWK, one that has traded their gritty, quirky minimalism for a sound that brims with dazzling hooks yet feels uncomfortably vapid.

White Space