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Thursday, Oct 30, 2003
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Issue #817 :: Thursday, October 30, 2003

Top Headlines

Bio Lacks Real Window into Hitch's Life
Amidst the hierarchical havoc of American pop culture, Alfred Hitchcock stands amongst such giants as the Beatles and "The Sopranos" as that rare fork between critical reverence and genuine commercial success for which aspiring artists so frequently pine. Film buffs roundly adore his work, but that doesn't mean that your average Joe didn't crack a smile when the appearance of the dentist's daughter in "Finding Nemo" was accompanied by the piercing strings from the "Psycho" score.

Winding Road to NCAAs Nears Final Turn
The October segment of the Cal men's soccer team's road to the NCAA tournament seemed to extend infinitely, reaching toward and over the horizon.

Budget Cuts Take Toll on Aging Campus Facilities
Just before sunset there are still traces of another lively day on Sproul Plaza: scores of colorful flyers, plastic cups and plates, newspapers and napkins. And they will probably stay there until the morning because the second afternoon litter pickup was eliminated this semester.

Zombie Guide Redefines Deadpan
Horror movies are about the externalization of inner fears-shedding light on them, exploring them and, most immediately, activating them full force. The most basic of horror's menagerie of fear incarnations is the zombie, a literalization of our rudimentary dread of death. Mindlessly, clumsily and relentlessly, death's denizens shamble toward us, attempting, without purpose, to rob us of that which makes us human: that pink gelatinous skull filler, the brain.

News

Budget Cuts Take Toll on Aging Campus Facilities
Just before sunset there are still traces of another lively day on Sproul Plaza: scores of colorful flyers, plastic cups and plates, newspapers and napkins. And they will probably stay there until the morning because the second afternoon litter pickup was eliminated this semester.

Lakireddy to Plead Guilty to Human Trafficking Charges
The older son of a wealthy Berkeley landlord plans to plead guilty on Friday to conspiring with his father to smuggle teenage Indian girls into the country for sex and cheap labor, according to court documents.

University Clamps Down on Bowles Halloween Party
Fears of chaos and overcrowding have put Bowles Hall's popular Halloween bash on a tight leash this Saturday.

Dean Encourages Youth in Local Speech
OAKLAND-With his arms stretched open, Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean greeted Bay Area supporters last night against a backdrop of blaring hip-hop beats.

News In Brief
Man Allegedly Spills Beer on Pizza Shop Patrons


Sports

Barriers Don't Baffle Cycling Bears
As it turns out, 80s rock music can be used for more than just air guitar sessions and an excuse for a bad hair day.

Winding Road to NCAAs Nears Final Turn
The October segment of the Cal men's soccer team's road to the NCAA tournament seemed to extend infinitely, reaching toward and over the horizon.

Predicting the Playoff Puzzle



Arts & Entertainment

Bio Lacks Real Window into Hitch's Life
Amidst the hierarchical havoc of American pop culture, Alfred Hitchcock stands amongst such giants as the Beatles and "The Sopranos" as that rare fork between critical reverence and genuine commercial success for which aspiring artists so frequently pine. Film buffs roundly adore his work, but that doesn't mean that your average Joe didn't crack a smile when the appearance of the dentist's daughter in "Finding Nemo" was accompanied by the piercing strings from the "Psycho" score.

Zombie Guide Redefines Deadpan
Horror movies are about the externalization of inner fears-shedding light on them, exploring them and, most immediately, activating them full force. The most basic of horror's menagerie of fear incarnations is the zombie, a literalization of our rudimentary dread of death. Mindlessly, clumsily and relentlessly, death's denizens shamble toward us, attempting, without purpose, to rob us of that which makes us human: that pink gelatinous skull filler, the brain.

Fillmmaker Is Feeling Pressed
A 34-year-old hipster Gapped out in a suede jacket and jeans with two shirt-buttons undone, Tom McCarthy doesn't look like the kind of filmmaker making revisionist westerns. And watching his acclaimed new film, "The Station Agent," you definitely wouldn't think this was the work of a first-time writer/director.

Ani Awes
Ani DiFranco's performance last Friday embodied everything that the knowing world has come to expect of the petite, dreadlocked, cargo-pant clad feminist who alternately makes love and war with lyrics sung in semi-tune to angry strokes of earthy guitar.

The PFA Presents Anime 101
Brand me middlebrow, but like most American moviegoers, I primarily know anime through the work of Studio Ghibli, the wildly inventive Japanese studio whose staff includes Isao Takahata and Hayao Miyazaki, arguably the most universally revered artist working today in any country and any medium.

"The Station Agent" Rides on Sturdy Tracks
Acting is the trademark of the American independent cinema, and "The Station Agent" exemplifies this with three spectacular performances.

Books Profile the Dumb and Dumber
Depressed by human ineptitude? Miss the circus of celebrity-cum-politician elections? Need an ego-boost because midterm mania is getting you down? One need look no further than "The Darwin Awards" by Wendy Northcutt and "Another Weird Year" by Huw Davies for a taste of the legendarily ludicrous.

'Human Stain' Fails to Leave a Mark
One of the great surprises of Robert Benton's "The Human Stain" is how closely it follows Philip Roth's novel, one of the key works of recent American literature, without dumbly mimicking it word for word. Characters like Coleman Silk, one of the "first Jews to teach the Classics," and Fauna Farely, Silk's 34-year-old mistress, are faithfully brought to life by Anthony Hopkins and Nicole Kidman respectively.

Music Review
When I saw the Strokes last Halloween at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, I heard some of their new material and remember it being as melodic, intense, and brilliant as anything on their highly acclaimed debut "Is This It."

White Space