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Thursday, Oct 9, 2003
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Issue #799 :: Thursday, October 9, 2003

Top Headlines

Martial Madness: 'Kill Bill' Knocks 'Em Dead
From the campy Shaw Brothers logo to the world's wickedest cliffhanger since J.R., "Kill Bill, Vol. 1" is a masterpiece of unprecedented proportions-the culmination of every martial arts film and spaghetti western ever released in American video stores; a bloody, fetishistic, sweaty bonanza of movie myths and cinematic trash; an over-the-top hour and a half that ousts "Moulin Rouge" as the wildest splurge into postmodern excess since, well, "Pulp Fiction."

Student Influx Forces a Look at Streamlining Graduation
Faced with booming student enrollment, the College of Letters and Science is experimenting with ways to help undergraduates quickly head out of the university with diplomas in hand.

Mama Mia! Cal Wins in Five
Five games. Three times as many wins on the line. And too tired to give high-fives at the end.

It's No Big Deal
Yes, the recall was somewhat of a travesty, and it does set a bad precedent. Funny thing is, a lot of those voting Arnold in seemed to think so too.

News

Student Influx Forces a Look at Streamlining Graduation
Faced with booming student enrollment, the College of Letters and Science is experimenting with ways to help undergraduates quickly head out of the university with diplomas in hand.

Yoga Class Stretches Bodies and Minds
Last year, UC Berkeley student Ruth Bosco was trapped in a bad living situation. She couldn't face going home every day. Her life was starting to fall apart, and she dropped out of school.

Changing of Gubernatorial Guard Brings Fears of New Cuts to UC, City
Arnold Schwarzenegger's landslide victory built on a campaign bereft of details has only injected more uncertainty into California's future, said city and UC Berkeley officials.

Former Employee to Sue UC, Says Forced to Join Religious Rituals
A former UC Berkeley employee plans to sue the university to recover his job, alleging pressure to participate in religious rituals on the job made him so uncomfortable that he quit.

Speakers Take Aim at U.S. Foreign Policy in Campus Discussion
U.S. foreign policy, corporate media and continuing U.S. imperialism were the main targets at the Berkeley Stop the War Coalition's panel discussion last night, in which keynote speakers Normon Solomon and Michael Parenti bashed the Bush administration in front of a lively crowd.

Correction
The photo caption for Monday's sports article "Cal Keeps Close With Nation's Elite" incorrectly identified the runner in the photo as Girmay Guangal.


Sports

Mama Mia! Cal Wins in Five
Five games. Three times as many wins on the line. And too tired to give high-fives at the end.

Athlete of the Week: Tim Kates, Men's Water Polo
Tim Kates was not a part of all four Cal victories at the NorCal Tournament over the weekend, but the goalie's effort against Stanford in the title match was one for the ages.

Sports in Brief
Despite a new course record in the opening round, the No. 3 Cal women's golf team fell just short of victory yesterday at the three-day Edean Ihlanfeldt Invitational, tying for second with No. 4 UCLA behind No. 2 Arizona.

Sleepless in Chicago
Hibernating through the first two rounds at the Windon Memorial Classic in Chicago, the Bears found themselves unable to wake up.

Camaraderie Culminates With Carefree Cal Men's Volleyball
You hear the sound of squeaky soles on the court.


Arts & Entertainment

Martial Madness: 'Kill Bill' Knocks 'Em Dead
From the campy Shaw Brothers logo to the world's wickedest cliffhanger since J.R., "Kill Bill, Vol. 1" is a masterpiece of unprecedented proportions-the culmination of every martial arts film and spaghetti western ever released in American video stores; a bloody, fetishistic, sweaty bonanza of movie myths and cinematic trash; an over-the-top hour and a half that ousts "Moulin Rouge" as the wildest splurge into postmodern excess since, well, "Pulp Fiction."

Ballet Toes Line Between Old and New
Graceful, pink-tutu'd ballerinas chasséing across the stage of "Swan Lake"-this was the creation of the legendary Kirov Ballet. Now, for the first time in 12 years, the world-renowned company is back in the Bay Area, accompanied by the Kirov Orchestra.

Crusoe-vation: 'Foe' Proves That No Play Is an Island
If the music had died in the middle of Peter Glazer's stage adaptation of J.M. Coetzee's "Foe" and all the actors had been silenced with cloth gags, my ass still would have been glued to the edge of my seat at Friday night's performance of the play at Zellerbach Playhouse.

Galleries' First Thursdays Get to the Art of the Matter
The cold and menacing concrete of Union Square seems a lot more appealing when it's filled with sunshine and the San Francisco Artists Guild. I wander through on my way from the BART stop to the galleries at 49 Geary. Sculptures, wax paintings and bright colors made the gray square much more hospitable. But that's enough sunshine for now...49 Geary awaits.

Music Review: Kill Bill Vol. 1 Soundtrack



Actress Isn't 'Out of Time' to Talk
Actress Sanaa Lathan is known primarily for her work in films that depict the lives of young African Americans in both touching and humorous ways. Her resume includes ensemble pieces such as "The Best Man" and "The Wood," as well as the critically acclaimed romantic comedy "Love and Basketball." Lathan can now be seen starring alongside Denzel Washington in director Carl Franklin's steamy, crime thriller "Out of Time." In a roundtable discussion with Lathan, held at the Ritz Carlton, the actress shared some of her opinions and experiences about film and theater.

Film 'Cruel' But Not 'Intolerable'
As I walked out of the theatre for the screening of "Intolerable Cruelty," my mind still trying to figure out just what the hell that movie was about, I heard a woman remark, "That was true love." I suppressed an urge to turn to her and reply, "No, that was true stupidity."

'The Holy Land' Reaches for Cinematic Heaven
Perhaps it's only appropriate that a film about Israel feel tumultuous and somewhat insufficient for its subject matter. Though Eitan Gorlin's ambitious project does its best to capture the hidden decadence of the holiest land on the planet, the film's striking visuals aren't enough to fulfill its thorny objectives. Exposing human depravity in Las Vegas or New York is a cinch, but when you're probing the underbelly of a city like Jerusalem, you need more than just good cinematography.

Elvis Movie Ain't Nothing But a Hound Dog
I can think of few films that sport a better concept than "Bubba Ho-tep," the basic plot of which can be summarized thusly: a geriatric Elvis (Bruce Campbell) teams up with a black JFK (Ossie Davis) to fight an evil Egyptian mummy that's preying on the residents of their elder care facility. Bizarre? Certainly. Brilliant? Definitely.

Bad Dog! No Biscuit!
I am trying really hard to judge "Good Boy!" as a children's movie. I really am. If I judge it as a kids' movie, I can at least say that there were some redeeming qualities. Qualities like cute animals, the triumph of the underdog, and character growth. But from my adult perspective, all I can see "Good Boy!" offering was cutesy humor, overly sentimental scenes, and cheesy dialogue.

Music Review: 'Dear Catastrophe Waitress'
Not since Todd Rundgren produced the New York Dolls or Phil Spector produced the Ramones has there been a mismatch between band and producer as hilarious as this one. Trevor "Buggles" Horn, knob-twiddler for every sleek dance-pop group since the dawn of the Age of Plastic, masterminding Belle and Sebastian, one of the most defiantly calm and organic ensembles of musicians performing today?

White Space