Issues

This Issue
Friday, Dec 6, 2002
Next Issue
Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008
(SI:Spring Orientation)
Search this issue:

Issue #648 :: Friday, December 6, 2002

Top Headlines

Cal-Georgia Could Be Close
A.J. Diggs and the handful or so of Cal players who hail from the L.A. area said they are looking forward to playing in front of hometown fans at the John Wooden Classic in Anaheim tomorrow.

Legal Mulligan
For the past seven months-or approximately forever-the university has been trying to solve the problem of Roberto Hernandez and the rest of the Wheeler protesters. It's a tricky one. There's pressure from the UC Board of Regents, from Gov. Gray Davis, from differing sides in the student body and from a defendant not noted for handling disputes quietly. But I and most observers were confident that in such a high-profile case the administration would take care to follow its own rules and handle matters professionally. Seven months later, we're either disappointed or angry.

Police Say Mayor Stole Newspapers
Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates has admitted responsibility for stealing and trashing about 1,000 copies of The Daily Californian that carried the student newspaper's endorsement of his opponent, police said yesterday.

NCAA Championship May Be Another Big Splash Rematch
The Cal men's water polo team thought it had seen the last of Stanford after defeating its foe in the second round of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Tournament last Saturday.

News

New Research May Explain Lack of Hot Spot Movement
You can thank low-viscosity rock for all those great Hawaiian vacations, according to two UC Berkeley researchers.

Feature Photo: Squirrel on Post


To Our Readers
Today is our last day of publication for this semester.
Visit www.dailycal.org for news over winter break.
Publication resumes on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2003.

Rally Committee Being Investigated for Disruptions
UC Berkeley officials said yesterday they are investigating student organizations-including the Rally Committee-for student conduct violations stemming from last week's Axe Rally where members of the group allegedly disrupted classes in progress.

Authorities Search East Oakland Home in Connection With Heist
Berkeley police and the FBI served a search warrant at an East Oakland residence early yesterday in connection with last month's deadly ATM heist.

Professor Calls for Fossil Fuels to Be Used in Developing Regions
A UC Berkeley scientist published in Science today an alternative view of energy use by the world's two billion rural poor, arguing fossil fuels may actually present a viable energy solution in certain situations.

News Analysis: ASUC Senate Achieves Success Despite Fiscal Restrictions
Wednesday night marked the final meeting of the ASUC Senate in a semester characterized by financial limitations.

State Budget Cuts May Have Impact on Berkeley Schools
Berkeley school officials are concerned Gov. Gray Davis' upcoming budget reductions may include devastating decreases in funding for the beleaguered Berkeley Unified School District.

University Loses Former Professor, Noted Psychologist
UC Berkeley professor emeritus Richard Lazarus passed away Nov. 24 of complications following an accident. He was 80 years old.

Man in Child Sex-Try Case Was Subject of Berkeley Probe
A Berkeley man, recently arrested for allegedly setting up a child molestation date, was investigated four years ago after a child neighbor accused him of sexual misconduct, police said yesterday.

Police Say Mayor Stole Newspapers
Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates has admitted responsibility for stealing and trashing about 1,000 copies of The Daily Californian that carried the student newspaper's endorsement of his opponent, police said yesterday.

News in Brief
UC Berkeley Student Dies, Cause Unknown

Calendar and Police Log


Wheeler Protester's Hearing Postponed Likely Until Monday
Dragging the Wheeler Hall case into finals, today's hearing for a

Online Extra: Wheeler Hearings Postponed Until Spring Semester
5:25 p.m.--When UC Berkeley students begin classes in the spring, some of those involved in Students for Justice in Palestine's April 9 sit-in at Wheeler Hall will finally face their hearings.


Sports

Cal-Georgia Could Be Close
A.J. Diggs and the handful or so of Cal players who hail from the L.A. area said they are looking forward to playing in front of hometown fans at the John Wooden Classic in Anaheim tomorrow.

NCAA Championship May Be Another Big Splash Rematch
The Cal men's water polo team thought it had seen the last of Stanford after defeating its foe in the second round of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Tournament last Saturday.

Volleyball Ready for NCAA Tourney
You could excuse a little extra enthusiasm from the Cal volleyball team.

Women's Basketball: Bears Host Tourney at Haas, Hope to Showcase Anaz
This weekend, the Cal women's basketball team will unveil new uniforms from a company called See Jane Run.

Sports in Brief
Men's Swimming Off to Lone Star State


Opinion

Legal Mulligan
For the past seven months-or approximately forever-the university has been trying to solve the problem of Roberto Hernandez and the rest of the Wheeler protesters. It's a tricky one. There's pressure from the UC Board of Regents, from Gov. Gray Davis, from differing sides in the student body and from a defendant not noted for handling disputes quietly. But I and most observers were confident that in such a high-profile case the administration would take care to follow its own rules and handle matters professionally. Seven months later, we're either disappointed or angry.

Editorial Cartoon by Deana Sobel


Editorial: Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates Must Resign Now
Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates has finally admitted to a theft he committed one month ago-stealing unread copies of The Daily Californian that endorsed his opponent the day before the election.

Boalt Must Consider Diversity
The University of California, Boalt Hall School of Law is currently generating racy headlines. The real story isn't sexy, but the future of Boalt Hall lies in the balance.

Landmark Supreme Court Cases Could Reverse Ban
The U.S. Supreme Court announced Dec. 2 that it will hear the two University of Michigan affirmative action cases- Gratz v. Bollinger and Grutter v. Bollinger-at the end of March or the beginning of April 2003. I write as a student defendant intervener in Grutter, the case involving the University of Michigan law school.

Letters to the Editor
UC Must Do More in Negotiations With Lecturers

White Space