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Tuesday, Jul 17, 2001
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Issue #368 :: Tuesday, July 17, 2001

Top Headlines

Workouts Ensure No Lazy Days for Bears
Spring practice ended in April, finals were in May, and the Cal football team was back on the field in June.

Shallow News Coverage, Deep Theater
It is impossible to leave the Berkeley Repertory Theatre's production of "The Laramie Project" without brooding about violence, homophobia, religion, politics and class-and recognizing the power of theater to address these difficult, relevant social issues. More impressively, the production also manages to convey the difficulty in doing just that. Bringing the process behind documentary theater to the fore, the play succeeds overwhelmingly in raising the question-what does it mean to "know" a small town and convey that impression to the rest of the world?

Regents to Vote on Admissions Proposal
The UC Board of Regents will vote on a proposal Wednesday that would make it easier for community college students in California to transfer to UC campuses.

Israeli Center Commits to Cal
While Cal men's basketball coach Ben Braun announced last week that Saulius Kuzminskas would not return to the team next season, Israeli big man Amit Tamir made a commitment to play for the Bears this fall.

News

Page 2 Interview -- Karl Hardiamon, Gardener, Berkeley Unified School District
How has it changed during your lifetime?

New Detailed Signals May Aid Berkeley Pedestrians
Berkeley pedestrians may see more than just a blinking orange hand on traffic signals soon.

Coca-Cola Prepares To Become Campus Beverage Provider
At least that is what Coke-drinking UC Berkeley students will be singing in the fall, as officials said yesterday that the Coca-Cola Company is expected to become the primary beverage supplier for the campus.

News in Brief: ‘Great, Charming' Former UC Berkeley Professor, Social Worker, Dies
Margaret Schubert, a former professor of social work at UC Berkeley, died on July 1. She was 89.

Relief from City's Energy Woes May Lie In Utilization of Solar-Powered Lighting
Berkeley's parking lots and parks may soon be lit up at night with the power of solar energy.

Council Votes to Conduct Study Addressing Day Labor Problem
Fidel stands on Hearst Avenue, as he does several days a week, driven by the prospect of short-term employment.

Regents to Vote on Admissions Proposal
The UC Board of Regents will vote on a proposal Wednesday that would make it easier for community college students in California to transfer to UC campuses.


Sports

Israeli Center Commits to Cal
While Cal men's basketball coach Ben Braun announced last week that Saulius Kuzminskas would not return to the team next season, Israeli big man Amit Tamir made a commitment to play for the Bears this fall.

Workouts Ensure No Lazy Days for Bears
Spring practice ended in April, finals were in May, and the Cal football team was back on the field in June.

Camps Teach Love of The Game
Melissa Arciniega sits with her seven-year-old son, Joe, on the bleachers of Evans Diamond to share the best view in the house on a Thursday afternoon.

Sports Briefs: Schott Shoots for Return to Under-21 Team
Cal women's soccer player Laura Schott will be one of 20 players taking part in a three-day United States under-21 training camp that begins today in Rhode Island.


Opinion

Shallow News Coverage, Deep Theater
It is impossible to leave the Berkeley Repertory Theatre's production of "The Laramie Project" without brooding about violence, homophobia, religion, politics and class-and recognizing the power of theater to address these difficult, relevant social issues. More impressively, the production also manages to convey the difficulty in doing just that. Bringing the process behind documentary theater to the fore, the play succeeds overwhelmingly in raising the question-what does it mean to "know" a small town and convey that impression to the rest of the world?

Editorial: Council Will Help City By Helping Day Laborers
The Berkeley City Council, in an effort to remedy problems caused by the presence day laborers in business districts (specifically the 4th Street area) and provide the workers with services, has requested that a study be undertaken to determine how best to meet the needs of both business owners and the workers.

Letters to the Editor: Pre-College Education Key to Minority Success
The real hope for helping African Americans and other minorities (SAT II Emphasis Will Not Raise Minority Enrollment," July 3) is to improve the K-12 school system. That is where the emphasis on affirmative action should be. Waiting until people have gone through a defective system, and then giving them preferences, including set asides and all kinds of reverse discrimination, is a pretty poor system, in my opinion.

ASUC Misguided in Coca-Cola Deal
The Executive Director of the ASUC has approved disclosing information about the Coca-Cola deal to the public. The ASUC has been in charge of the vending machines all over campus for years now and has contracted out to Pepsi or Coca-Cola for over 12 years now (according to the Executive Director of the ASUC Auxiliary). Supposedly, the ASUC ran the vending machines as a service to the campus, but in recent years the ASUC has turned itself into a big marketing agency and dealer of Pepsi of sorts.

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