Issues

Previous Issue
Monday, Aug 10, 2009
This Issue
Thursday, Aug 13, 2009
Next Issue
Monday, Aug 17, 2009
Search this issue:

Issue #2305 :: Thursday, August 13, 2009

Issue #2305 Cover

Top Headlines

BART STRIKE AVERTED
BART and its second largest labor union reached a tentative contract agreement Sunday evening, averting a strike that would have had a debilitating affect on transportation in the Bay Area.

Fall Camp Notebook: Day Nine
People walking by Memorial Stadium on Saturday morning kept stopping to peer inside because, for all the world, it sounded like football season had started. In the quiet of Strawberry Canyon, Memorial was alive was blaring crowd noise, referees' whistles and, occasionally, the hard plastic thud of pads.

Fall Camp Notebook: Day Eight
The red jerseys were out in numbers Friday afternoon as the Cal football team began week two of fall camp with a few starters battling injuries.

Unions May Strike After BART Board of Directors Imposes Work Rules
The BART Board of Directors voted unanimously to impose work rules on BART's second largest union Thursday, a decision that both sides have said would lead to a systemwide strike.

News

Graduate School Web Server Suffers Breach
A security breach on the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Web server last month prompted school officials to notify almost 500 people whose private information may be at risk.

Lab Facility Plans Shaped by Challenges
A proposal earlier this month to house UC Berkeley's Helios project in two separate facilities is the latest chapter in a long saga to provide the alternative fuel initiative with its own facility.

Campus Eliminates High-Level Position
In an e-mail announcing the elimination of a senior UC Berkeley administrative position, Vice Chancellor and Provost George Breslauer said efforts to help curb the campus's financial deficit will likely include further reductions in top-level positions.

Feature Photo: Holding Court


UC to Sell Build America Bonds to Fund Projects
A week after it said that it would loan the state $200 million to kick-start stalled construction projects, the UC system announced that it will sell bonds worth more than $1 billion to pay for ongoing capital work at 10 campuses.

BART May Impose Work Rules After Union's Contract Rejection
BART could decide to impose new work rules on train operators, station agents and other employees after its second-largest labor union rejected a proposed contract this week.

Elimination of Staff Position Comes Under Fire
As the campus begins to trim $100 million to close an unprecedented deficit, graduate students are decrying the elimination of a staff position in a move some say lacked transparency.

Bayer's Berkeley Facility May Outsource Work
Berkeley's largest private employer may be outsourcing work in order to cut manufacturing costs, prompting city officials to expedite the passage of tax incentives for local businesses.

ASUC Officials Plan to Dispute Fund Reallocation Podcast
ASUC officials have delayed taking action to protest a move by UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau that they said violates a 1998 agreement between the student government and the campus.

Campus Habitat for Humanity Chapter Receives Award, Grant
UC Berkeley's Habitat for Humanity chapter has been recognized as the organization's Campus Chapter of the Year, and will receive the award in October.

Unions May Strike After BART Board of Directors Imposes Work Rules
The BART Board of Directors voted unanimously to impose work rules on BART's second largest union Thursday, a decision that both sides have said would lead to a systemwide strike.

BART STRIKE AVERTED
BART and its second largest labor union reached a tentative contract agreement Sunday evening, averting a strike that would have had a debilitating affect on transportation in the Bay Area.


Sports

Fall Camp Notebook: Day Six
Kevin Riley was efficient, accurate and comfortable quarterbacking the Cal football team's offense on Wednesday. Which, he says, considering his experience, is the way it should be.

Fall Camp: Follow My Lead
In Will Ta'ufo'ou, the Cal football team lost a 6-foot, 255-pound fullback who could bulldoze a linebacker, surprise you with his speed, catch a pass out of the backfield and -- despite guiding 1,500-yard rushers in back-to-back years -- probably go unnoticed on campus.

Fall Camp: Day Seven
The Cal offense has been running the reverse with several different players in practice, but when all 5-feet-and-a-generous-7 inches of wide receiver Isi Sofele had the ball in his hands, the play was finally gasp-worthy. In one of the first plays of 7-on-7's on Thursday, Sofele burst up the sideline -- sprung free about ten yards from the line of scrimmage by a block from offensive lineman Mike Tepper -- for an easy score.

Fall Camp Notebook: Day Eight
The red jerseys were out in numbers Friday afternoon as the Cal football team began week two of fall camp with a few starters battling injuries.

Bears Beat Physical Tigers to Claim Exhibition Win
Yelling and throwing clipboards doesn't usually happen in an exhibition game. But neither does extremely hard tackling that goes unpenalized by the referees.

Fall Camp Notebook: Day Nine
People walking by Memorial Stadium on Saturday morning kept stopping to peer inside because, for all the world, it sounded like football season had started. In the quiet of Strawberry Canyon, Memorial was alive was blaring crowd noise, referees' whistles and, occasionally, the hard plastic thud of pads.


Arts & Entertainment

'Paper Heart' Defies Romantic-Comedy Mold
Ah, love-the omnipresent topic that has been too often explored in entertainment, and yet there's nothing more enigmatic. What exactly is love? How can you tell if you're in love? Can everyone find love? In the mockumentary "Paper Heart," directed by Nicholas Jasenovec, the adamant non-believer Charlyne Yi seeks the answers to these questions and more, only to be interrupted by Michael Cera, resulting in an earnest relationship that will bring a smile to your face.

Sea Change
Color-the first thing you notice about Hayao Miyazaki's latest film, "Ponyo," is the gorgeous, shimmering, unbelievably vibrant color. The phrase "feast for the eyes" comes to mind. So does "acid trip."

Davis Guggenheim Talks About His Work on 'It Might Get Loud'
Davis Guggenheim is the Academy Award-winning director of "An Inconvenient Truth" (2006). After guest directing on TV series "24," "Alias," "Deadwood" and "Numb3rs," in his latest documentary, "It Might Get Loud," he explores the electric guitar through the lens of three of rock's biggest names: Jimmy Page, the Edge and Jack White. The Daily Californian spoke with him about the cyclical nature of rock 'n' roll.

SFMOMA Exhibit 'Sensate' Is Overly Cryptic
Modern and contemporary art tend to get a bad rap for being the type of stuff that artsy people will call "inspired," or "genius," or whatever, just so they can seem open-minded, but which leaves most people scratching their heads. It's the sort of thing that takes longer to explain than it did to make, or that's supposed to revolutionize the way you look at everyday objects. This is-for better or worse-the type of art that's featured in "Sensate: Bodies and Design."

Pop Theory
Last weekend, while I was celebrating Lollapalooza with hipsters and emo kids alike, my best friend Tiffany left me a voice message. She said, verbatim, "Lady Gaga has a penis. Call me back."

Album 'Hot Mess' From Cobra Starship Is Messy, But Not Hot Podcast
It's impossible not to make the lame joke that everyone must be thinking when they come across the name of Cobra Starship's latest album, Hot Mess. It really is a "hot mess," or maybe just a mess. You'd think a band that looks like it's had neon vomited on them and has a wacky name like Cobra Starship would be original, but with Hot Mess, they're far from it.

White Space