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Issue #2269 :: Friday, May 1, 2009

Issue #2269 Cover

Top Headlines

Local School to Close Due to Probable Swine Flu Case
The first probable case of the H1N1 swine flu strain in Berkeley has prompted the city's health department and the Berkeley Unified School District superintendent to close a local elementary school for the next seven days, officials announced today.

Berkeley Man Sentenced to Prison Term for Child Pornography
A Berkeley man was sentenced in federal court Wednesday to about eight years in prison and ordered to pay a $25,000 fine for transporting child pornography to the United States.

Regents to Meet By Teleconference
The UC Board of Regents will be condensing their May meeting into one day and holding it via teleconference, UC officials announced today.

Bears Quest for Sixth Straight Title Falls at Foot of Davies, BYU
Tied 22 points apiece in Saturday's national title match, the five-time defending champion Cal rugby team missed two penalty kick opportunities before receiving a penalty just outside its 22-meter line.

News

Search for New Journalism School Dean Fails
The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism's second search for a dean came to an end this week, after the four top candidates withdrew from the process.

ASUC Votes To Approve New Budget After Cuts
The ASUC's 2009-10 budget passed in the senate Thursday morning, ending a 10-hour meeting during which student groups made final appeals for

Service Delivers Local Eats to Students Video
Between lab write-ups and final essays, UC Berkeley senior Rachel Lee said she does not always have time to scavenge for food.

Week in Review Slideshow Gallery


Obama Boosts Government's Role in Funding Universities
Since taking office in January, President Barack Obama has expanded the government's role in financing higher education, including augmenting federal financial aid for low-income students and siphon funds toward campus research.

Bay Area Shoreline Faces Flooding in 40 Years
A recent report issued by a local conservation commission found that areas of the Berkeley shoreline are in danger of flooding in the next 40 years as a result of expected climate change.

Lawyer Requests Removal of District Attorney From BART Case
The attorney for a former BART police officer charged with the shooting death of Oscar Grant III on New Year's Day filed a motion Tuesday to have the Alameda County District Attorney's Office removed from the case.

Regents to Meet By Teleconference
The UC Board of Regents will be condensing their May meeting into one day and holding it via teleconference, UC officials announced today.

Berkeley Man Sentenced to Prison Term for Child Pornography
A Berkeley man was sentenced in federal court Wednesday to about eight years in prison and ordered to pay a $25,000 fine for transporting child pornography to the United States.

Student Proposals Win Bears Breaking Boundaries Funding
Winners of the fourth-annual Bears Breaking Boundaries competition were announced Wednesday, and a total of $85,000 was allocated for 33 innovative proposals authored by students.

Board of Education Hears Steps To Implement 2020 Vision Plan
The Berkeley Unified School District Board of Education heard concrete implementation steps Wednesday for a plan that aims to improve graduation rates in the district by the year 2020.

USC Professor Will Be College Of Environmental Design Dean
Jennifer Wolch, a USC geography and urban planning professor, was named the ninth dean of the College of Environmental Design, campus officials announced Wednesday.

Campus to Remember Leader Of 1969 Ethnic Studies Strike
Several campus departments will hold a memorial for Richard Aoki, a student leader of the 1969 strike for ethnic studies at UC Berkeley, tomorrow in Wheeler Auditorium at 2 p.m. Aoki passed away on March 15 at the age of 70.

Four UC Campuses Granted Stem Cell Research Funds
Four UC campuses were granted more than $21 million Wednesday by the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine for stem cell research to develop disease-treating technologies.

City Council Accepts Grant to Plan 1,200 Trees
The Berkeley City Council accepted a grant from a state agency on April 21 to plant 1,200 trees over the next two years.

Berkeley Police Investigate Recent Hit-and-Run Case
Police are investigating a hit-and-run in Berkeley Wednesday night that left a victim in serious condition.

Local School to Close Due to Probable Swine Flu Case
The first probable case of the H1N1 swine flu strain in Berkeley has prompted the city's health department and the Berkeley Unified School District superintendent to close a local elementary school for the next seven days, officials announced today.


Sports

Defending Champs Draw Black Knights in National Semis Podcast
After being grilled on the state of his own team, Brigham Young rugby coach David Smyth threw in a question of his own.

It's Not a Foregone Conclusion, Yet
It's playoff time and, just like the Cal ruggers, I'm supposed to be at the peak of my game.

Bears Endure Bumps on Tough Road
When the Cal lacrosse team looks back on its tumultuous, challenging and unpredictable 2009 season, it can take comfort in knowing it faced off with the best in the NCAA.

Drewrey Hits Stride Just in Time for Nation's Top Bats
There is one question that the No. 13 Cal softball team is going to have to answer this weekend:

Bears Visit Arizona With Time Running Short to 'Turn it Around'
Shortly after the Cal baseball team played Arizona State looking like a squad that cared about protecting its dwindling postseason hopes, the Bears turned around and laid an egg against Pacific.

Burney Likes Chances at Qualifying for NCAA's
As the Cal track and field team heads back to Stanford tomorrow for the Payton Jordan Invitational, time is running out for most Bears runners, jumpers and throwers to post qualifying marks for NCAA regionals in May.

Rankings Go Out the Boat in Race Toward Schwabacher Cup
One year ago, Stanford shocked the rowing world by upsetting the Cal men's crew team in the Big Row for the first time in 17 years.

Six-Race Streak Hangs in Balance at Big Row
Two weekends ago, the top-ranked varsity boat of the Cal women's crew team defeated Stanford by almost nine seconds at the Lake Natoma Invitational.

Chizever and Zerbini Receive At-Large Bid
The No. 19-ranked duo of senior Geoff Chizever and sophomore Pedro Zerbini were selected as one of 17 at-large doubles teams for the NCAA Division I Men's Championship.

Five Bears to Compete in NCAA Singles Tournament
A school-record five members of the No. 9 Cal women's tennis team were selected to compete in the NCAA singles tournament, which begins May 20 at Mitchell Tennis Center in College Station, Texas.

Bears Knock Off Black Knights, Advance to Championship Rematch With BYU
Going into Friday's semifinal game, the Cal ruby team's goal was a one-point win to advance to the championship match. But true to form, the Bears put up 23 insurance points in a 42-17 win over Army.

Bears Quest for Sixth Straight Title Falls at Foot of Davies, BYU
Tied 22 points apiece in Saturday's national title match, the five-time defending champion Cal rugby team missed two penalty kick opportunities before receiving a penalty just outside its 22-meter line.


Opinion

Hello, Mister 60th Vote Podcast
On Tuesday, Democrats welcomed into the fold someone who might be more important than the president himself: a single grumpy Republican senator from Pennsylvania.

Check Those in Charge
Since the beginning of Mark Yudof's tenure, the University of California has attempted to undergo an image makeover from the scandalous remnants of Robert Dynes' reign. Harping on certain key words, like accountability, transparency and affordability, the "new" UC has attempted to prove itself as a responsible and fair body deserving of the trust of students and California taxpayers.

Please, Do Tell
For months, many UC students have expected a nearly 10-percent increase in our fees next year. The UC Regents themselves have been pondering this exact hike since at least November, yet only two days ago UC President Mark Yudof finally issued an actual fee proposal.

Consider Immigrants in May Day Activism
"To divide and conquer," said Julius Caesar, and we listened. May 1, historically characterized as the day workers make demands for better work conditions, now extends to the demands of undocumented immigrants, and rightly so. Serving us on below minimum wage salaries and with few rights, this community suffers from constant fear of the ICE police and an educational tracking system that bars their children from attaining higher education. But what entitled them to this second class treatment? Although most would not point to the color of their skin or their nationality, the idea of "legal status" is as synthetic (and bogus) as the latter choices, all of which we still use today as the basis of tacit discrimination. Nevertheless mainstream media and governmental institutions will bend backward to justify this second class treatment because a united movement of 11 million strong combined with hundreds of thousands of documented American minorities for dignity and equal treatment severely threatens white privilege.

IAS Coalition Voice Must Not Be Stifled
California Hall was finished in 1906. In 1906 the Women's Rights Movement was stagnated in abstraction. In 1906 the Civil Rights Movement, the Free Speech Movement, the Zapatista Movement, the death of Martin Luther King, the death of Mario Savio, the death of students and protesters on Tiananmen Square, remained the mists of a distant dream. In 1906, California Hall was a large and overwhelming building, and above all, an impenetrable space for many.

Why Do You Relay? Do the Walk for Life
I thought high school was rough enough with college applications and AP tests. Yet, this was nothing compared to my recent reality, my cancer. For a while, when I looked in the mirror, I didn't see cancer; I saw my same, young 17-year-old face. After my first chemotherapy round, however, I started to witness the cancer's image. My face grew puffy from the medicine. My hair quickly fell off my head. My morning hair routine changed; instead of straightening my hair, I took it off a stand and pulled it over my head. I suddenly had a seven-day pill container that was so full that the pills spilled over for each day. And, I no longer reported to the track after school for practice; rather, I drove my grandma's old car to City of Hope-a leading cancer treatment center in Duarte, California. As I spent hours hooked up the IV machines that fed me the chemotherapy bags, I pointed my face toward the window, closed my eyes and wished for nothing more than good health.

White Space