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Monday, Nov 5, 2007
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Issue #1743 :: Monday, November 5, 2007

Top Headlines

Benign Fantasies
Joseph Cornell was born in 1903 to a comfortably middle-class family. He worked as a salesman and later as a graphic designer, converted to Christian Science in 1925, never married and for most of his life lived in the same suburban home in Long Island. These facts seem important to his art as limitations both to be respected and mentally overcome, since his work is marked by nothing so much as the reconciliation between the artist’s extraordinary creativity and the mundane materiality of its context. His art is a marvelous paean to the well-behaved subconscious.

Bears Regain Footing With Win Over Cougars Podcast
It’s been quite awhile since anyone on the Cal football team knew what it felt like to win.

Court Upholds Ruling Against University
A San Francisco appeals court Friday upheld a 2006 court ruling ordering the University of California to pay $33.8 million to former UC professional school students.

The Best of Both Worlds
A team of physicists on campus built a radio out of a single carbon nanotube one-ten-thousandth the size of a human hair. One of the first songs they beamed through it was, of course, “Good Vibrations.” Also last week, a national newspaper announced that a team of political scientists discovered a new form of government. They called it a megolocracy, but it’s extremely unstable and decays quickly into anarchy.

News

Court Upholds Ruling Against University
A San Francisco appeals court Friday upheld a 2006 court ruling ordering the University of California to pay $33.8 million to former UC professional school students.

Beware of Plants


Merger Will Unite Leading Car-Sharing Companies
The only two national car-sharing companies, both of which operate in Berkeley, announced last week that they are merging.

To Fill The Room With Song
While the Grateful Dead and other psychedelic rock greats were taking over the Bay Area music scene in the late ’60s, a small coffee house opened its doors to folk musicians from around the world.

Research & Ideas
Tiny Radio Scales Down Tuning In

With the advance of technology, cell phones and all sorts of devices have shrunk dramatically. Now that UC Berkeley physicists have built a radio one-ten-thousandth the diameter of a human hair, however, miniaturization has reached a whole new scale.

New Low-Income Housing Not Enough to Clear Huge Waitlists
Although more than 130 units of new low-income housing have opened during the last month, city officials and housing developers say the supply barely begins to serve the thousands of applicants requesting it.

Frequent False Fire Alarms Part of Stanley Hall’s ‘Growing Pains’
Multiple false fire alarms and evacuations have disrupted work and classes at Stanley Hall in recent weeks, but campus officials say the incidents are a normal part of working out the kinks of operating a new building.

Berkeley High Buildings Nominated for National Historic Recognition
Eight buildings on the Berkeley High School campus were nominated for the National Register of Historic Places Thursday because they exemplify cultural and social trends in the development of public education, officials said.


Sports

Bears Regain Footing With Win Over Cougars Podcast
It’s been quite awhile since anyone on the Cal football team knew what it felt like to win.

Defense Has a Ball in Solid Performance
After witnessing a particularly lackluster March to Victory, the Cal defense got together for a meeting before taking the field against Washington State. They spoke about the need for unity and having fun, about flying around and making plays.

Ground Game Chops Away at WSU Defense
On paper, Justin Forsett had an impressive day against the Washington State defense, racking up 132 yards and scoring the Cal football team’s two touchdowns.

Field Hockey
Crane’s Career, Bears’ Season Come to Abrupt End With Loss to Stanford in NorPac Championship Match

STANFORD—Wiping away tears with her wristband and leading her Cal field hockey teammates, team captain Jenny Crane jogged down the sidelines and high-fived fans for one last time.

Women's Basketball
Bears Steamroll Loyola-New Orleans in Final Exhibition Match

There were two preseason top-20 teams on the court Sunday afternoon at Haas Pavilion.

Men's Soccer
Cal’s Three Seniors Account for Three Goals to Win Final Game at Edwards

Three weeks ago, UCLA sucker punched the No. 24 Cal men’s soccer team with a late goal in the 88th minute, escaping with a 1-0 win and handing the Bears their second loss of the weekend.

Volleyball
Bears Front Line Shuts Down the Pac-10’s Kill Leader, Coasts to Sweep Over Oregon

It has been said that only two things in life are certain.

Men's Polo
More Last-Minute Magic Fuels Comeback Win Over Anteaters

The No. 1 Cal men’s water polo team was swimming in uncharted waters.

Women's Soccer
Barnes Cleans Up in Narrow Weekend Wins Over the Huskies and Cougars

The No. 19 Cal women’s soccer team was a little sloppy in trying to close the door on a pair of tight games this weekend at Edwards Stadium, but junior Valerie Barnes was there to clean things up.

Women's Tennis
Indoor Title Eludes Babos Once More as She Falls in Straight Sets in Quarterfinals; Visico Tripped Up by Top Seed

For the first time since her freshman year, Cal women’s tennis player Susie Babos felt absolutely helpless on the court during her 2-6, 2-6 loss to Duke’s Ellah Nze in the quarterfinals of the ITA National Intercollegiate Indoors Championships in Columbus, Ohio.

Women's Swimming
Silver’s Three Wins Helps Push Bears Over Former Assistant Coach

In the first two meets of the season, the No. 3 Cal women’s swimming team went only three events without a first-place finish.

Men's Swimming
Huskies Left in the Wake in Cal’s Final Dual Meet of Season

While the No. 7 Cal men’s swimming team started fast on Friday, the day was best summed up by the Bears’ All-American who forgot to start completely.


Arts & Entertainment

Benign Fantasies
Joseph Cornell was born in 1903 to a comfortably middle-class family. He worked as a salesman and later as a graphic designer, converted to Christian Science in 1925, never married and for most of his life lived in the same suburban home in Long Island. These facts seem important to his art as limitations both to be respected and mentally overcome, since his work is marked by nothing so much as the reconciliation between the artist’s extraordinary creativity and the mundane materiality of its context. His art is a marvelous paean to the well-behaved subconscious.

Heavy Metal Gets Animated at Pauley Ballroom
The disco ball, high-end acoustics and hardwood floors were all that kept Pauley Ballroom from becoming a suburban metal venue when Austin, Texas-based … And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead and Dethklok took the stage Friday night. Trail of Dead have toured with metal bands before, but Dethklok aren’t simply a band; they are the focus of Cartoon Network’s “Adult Swim” animated show “Metalocalypse,” which contrasts the rocking of the “world’s most brutal band” with their excessive yet bizarrely mundane lives. “Adult Swim” threw in another twist by using the tour to advertise the release of “Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock,” also featuring Dethklok. In one fell swoop, “Adult Swim” cross-promoted metal, art rock, video games and their own cartoons. Combined with Verizon’s “text your ‘most brutal pic’” contest, there is no wonder why this concert was free.

CD Reviews
How can you not be re-tired of Jay-Z? The frequent rap Messiah act is wearing thin these days, reminding one of Michael Jordan’s publicized career resurrections. Actually, that analogy is a bit flawed: Insert “a dude who thinks he’s MJ” in place of Michael Jordan, and we have a better idea of why the attention hawking annoys on American Gangster.

No Shortage of Charm in ACT’s Production of ‘The Rainmaker’
For some reason, modern theater has abandoned that warm-and-fuzzy feeling. Our postmodern palettes just don’t have any time for drama that is touching, or heartfelt or (God forbid) simple. The American Conservatory Theater might seem to be taking a risk producing a show without death, disease, acrobatics or long, pensive silences. But as its reception indicates, “The Rainmaker” is a cheerful success, still charming audiences more than 50 years after its film debut.

Despite Potent Cast, ‘American Gangster’ Shoots Blanks
“American Gangster” has a very incomplete, scattered feel to it. Scenes lack setup and context, motivations are unexplained and we’re deprived of important information. When a movie has these symptoms, my immediate suspicion is it was edited heavily in the post-production process for length, a common practice, and important scenes were lost as a result. But “American Gangster” is more than two-and-a-half hours long; obviously, no one was afraid of it being too long. So my next best guess is the production was rushed. It feels like a six-month shooting schedule packed into five.

Interview: ... And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead
Jason Reese is the drummer and sometimes frontman of Austin, Texas' rock outift ... And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead. The band is currently on tour with the "Adult Swim"-associated metal band Dethklok.

White Space