Issues

This Issue
Thursday, Jun 14, 2007
Next Issue
Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008
(SI:Spring Orientation)
Search this issue:

Issue #1623 :: Thursday, June 14, 2007

Top Headlines

Off The Canvas
Given that Henri Matisse was perhaps the 20th century's most phenomenally gifted painter, it's easy to dismiss everything else he did as secondary in importance. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's “Matisse: Painter as Sculptor” aims to counter this longstanding prejudice by shifting attention towards the artist's lesser known three-dimensional production. For those unfamiliar with this aspect of the artist's work, the results are sure to be a revelation. Matisse emerges from the SFMOMA galleries not a dabbling dilettante but a sculptor of profound originality and importance.

Fire Engulfs House on College
Police responded to a three-alarm structural fire at a residence on College Avenue at 9:14 p.m. last night.

I’ll Have Thirds, Please
A trip to the local Century 25 Theaters over the weekend reaffirmed a few things for me. First, that I’m not the biggest fan of going to the movies. (Why? Full-blast meat locker air conditioning, overpriced generic snacks and annoying people who laugh at parts of the movie that aren’t even funny).

Berkeley Repertory Theatre Scores With ‘Great Men of Genius’
Theatre is a tricky proposition. On any given day, you balance the possibility of seeing something laughably pompous versus the smaller chance of seeing something brilliant in concept andexecution. It’s a risk that increasingly few are willing to take, opting instead for a more democratic affair.

News

Fire Engulfs House on College
Police responded to a three-alarm structural fire at a residence on College Avenue at 9:14 p.m. last night.

UC Appeals Enron Bank Case to Supreme Court
The University of California has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear an appeal to overturn a decision that banks could not be held responsible for losses incurred during the Enron Corporation scandal.

New Board Meets on Housing Authority
The new board of commissioners charged with overseeing the troubled Berkeley Housing Authority met for the first time Tuesday to approve a transitional plan for the agency.

Letters of Intent Down for Some Minorities
The number of underrepresented minority students intending to enroll next year is down at UC Berkeley, according to incoming freshman class data released by the the university Tuesday, a drop that officials say does not match systemwide numbers.

Council Sends Commons Initiative to Commissions
The City Council voted Tuesday to send an initiative aimed at cleaning up Berkeley streets to a number of city commissions to receive more feedback before a final vote is taken in November.

High Schoolers, Anti-War Group Protest Military Recruitment
Students at Berkeley High School along with an anti-war group held a press conference near the school Monday opposing the war in Iraq and a federal policy requiring student information to be released to military recruiters.

Community Meets to Discuss South Berkeley Library Move
Community members discussed accessibility for people with disabilities and children in a meeting concerning a move of the South Berkeley library branch.

Alum’s Book Explores Berkeley Life in the Turbulent 1960s
While many students read about the tumult of Berkeley in the 1960’s through a textbook, UC Berkeley alumnus and author Allan Brown, who witnessed the changing political scene during his college years, wrote his own book about it.

Research & Ideas
Study Links Birth Weight and Later-Life Health, Success

A study co-authored by a UC Berkeley professor has found that low birth weight could lead to poor adult health and a lack of socioeconomic success.

People’s Park May Loosen Sales Limits
It may become easier to conduct limited commercial activity in People’s Park after a revision of policy clarifies the guidelines.

Iraqi Labor Leaders Speak in Berkeley
Two Iraqi labor leaders spoke in North Berkeley Tuesday about the importance of a continued effort by the American people to end the U.S. occupation of Iraq.

Obituary
Professor, 75, Developed New Geochemistry Method

Harold Helgeson, a professor in the earth and planetary sciences department at UC Berkeley, died of lung cancer at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center on May 28 at the age of 75.

Professor Wins Highest Prize of American Chemical Society
UC Berkeley chemistry professor Gabor Somorjai was announced last week as the winner of the Priestley Medal, the most prestigious award given by the American Chemical Society.

News in Brief
Council Passes Resolution To Help Telegraph Business

Clarification
Monday’s article “Suspect in Ceremony Attack Pleads Not Guilty” may have implied Wodaje Bantidagne threatened Lindsey Herbert immediately following her suggestion he seek medical attention. In fact, the threat did not immediately follow the suggestion.

Correction
Monday’s article “Professor and Poet Loved to Play With the Language” should have been attributed to Joanna Kwong.


Arts & Entertainment

Berkeley Repertory Theatre Scores With ‘Great Men of Genius’
Theatre is a tricky proposition. On any given day, you balance the possibility of seeing something laughably pompous versus the smaller chance of seeing something brilliant in concept andexecution. It’s a risk that increasingly few are willing to take, opting instead for a more democratic affair.

She May Fall Short of Perfection, But Lucinda Williams Searches Admirably
Lucinda Williams is a notorious perfectionist—known to re-record her back catalog and for her meticulous pacing of new album releases, she’s come to have a reputation as something of a problem child to work with in the music industry. The chance to see Williams in concert, then, is exciting for the opportunity to see her stripped of a certain level of pre-meditation. But last Thursday at the Paramount in Oakland, Williams proved that perfection isn’t just the rule to her studio recordings, it’s the rule to her entire career.

Off The Canvas
Given that Henri Matisse was perhaps the 20th century's most phenomenally gifted painter, it's easy to dismiss everything else he did as secondary in importance. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's “Matisse: Painter as Sculptor” aims to counter this longstanding prejudice by shifting attention towards the artist's lesser known three-dimensional production. For those unfamiliar with this aspect of the artist's work, the results are sure to be a revelation. Matisse emerges from the SFMOMA galleries not a dabbling dilettante but a sculptor of profound originality and importance.

Book Review
The past few years have seen the dawn of a new kind of superhero. With “Smallville,” we learn that Superman suffered his share of high school angst. In “Spider-Man,” Tobey Maguire shows us how much of a loser the web-slinger can be. And on “Heroes,” Peter Petrelli proves that emo hair and crime fighting aren’t mutually exclusive. These days, heroes aren’t perfect. They’re, well, kind of like us.

CD Reviews
Remember how great that Queens of the Stone Age track “No One Knows” sounded on the radio when it first came out? The up-down bass-snare, the staccato vocals that made you jam in the car on the way to your first class? Kind of a tough act to follow, and the band already tried in 2005 with Lullabies to Paralyze.

Track Reviews
‘Plaster Casts of Everything’

The To-Do List
The White Stripes


Opinion

I’ll Have Thirds, Please
A trip to the local Century 25 Theaters over the weekend reaffirmed a few things for me. First, that I’m not the biggest fan of going to the movies. (Why? Full-blast meat locker air conditioning, overpriced generic snacks and annoying people who laugh at parts of the movie that aren’t even funny).

White Space