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Thursday, Mar 1, 2007
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Issue #1478 :: Thursday, March 1, 2007

Top Headlines

Ten Years Later, Wildcats in Familiar Spot
The Cal men’s basketball team begins March with an opponent that has made a habit of playing deep into the month.

The Cult of Picasso
Pablo Picasso’s impact on the artists of the United States has never been underestimated, and a new exhibit at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art understands the enormity of the artist’s legacy. “Picasso and American Art,” originally curated by Michael FitzGerald for the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, is a dense and substantial exploration of Picasso’s influence upon American artists, even if it never strays far from its textbook leanings.

UC Avoids Fine After Laboratory Violations
The National Nuclear Security Administration fined UC $1.1 million Monday for 15 violations of nuclear safety standards at the UC-managed Los Alamos National Laboratory, but the penalty was waived because of the lab’s former non-profit status.

The IPod Education Gap
Oprah Winfrey’s newest project, featured on an ABC primetime special this past Monday, is The Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls, a $40 million, 52-acre, 28-building, state-of-the-art independent school promoting academic achievement for girls living near Johannesburg, South Africa. When asked why she chose to construct her “dream school” in Africa, she replied: “There’s no better place than Africa because the sense of need, the sense of value for education and the appreciation for it could not be greater.”

News

UC Avoids Fine After Laboratory Violations
The National Nuclear Security Administration fined UC $1.1 million Monday for 15 violations of nuclear safety standards at the UC-managed Los Alamos National Laboratory, but the penalty was waived because of the lab’s former non-profit status.

City Budget Surplus to Boost Fire, Other Services
The Berkeley Fire Department, the Berkeley Office of Economic Development and the Telegraph Avenue revitalization project will benefit from $2 million in one-time expenditures approved last night by the Berkeley City Council, but officials say new taxes may be needed to address long-term costs.

Shattuck Barnes & Noble May Be Closing Doors
One major chain bookstore in Berkeley could soon close because of some of the same factors that have led smaller independent bookstores to close their doors.

Senate Strikes ASUC Election Monitors
Continuing their reforms of the election process, the ASUC Senate passed a bill last night that removes the requirement that a neutral, outside observer monitors the ASUC elections.

Blogging About Pro-Israel Journalist Puts Writer in Court
A UC Berkeley student who maintains a blog critical of a local freelance journalist was brought to small claims court yesterday, as the journalist said the student has interfered with his business opportunities.

Campus Marrow Drive Focuses on Minority Donors
Berkeley students and staff members came together to organize a donor drive this week in a campuswide effort to raise awareness for the need for marrow and stem cell donors.

Freshman Sustains Head Injuries in Fall from Unit 2
A freshman fell out of a third-story room in Griffiths Hall in Unit 2 last night, sustaining significant head injuries, police and witnesses said.

News in Brief
Oak Grove Activist Posts Bail, Says He Plans to Sue University


Sports

Ten Years Later, Wildcats in Familiar Spot
The Cal men’s basketball team begins March with an opponent that has made a habit of playing deep into the month.

In The Spotlight
The understudy’s role is simple: learn the part so if the lead can’t do the show, then the understudy is in.

Bears Saved By Hot Bats, Frankiewicz
On March 8, 2006, Lauren Frankiewicz was in trouble.

Vidmar Invite Is Calm Before Storm for Cal
After placing third in a competition that consisted of five other ranked teams last week, the No. 7 Cal men’s gymnastics squad will test its newfound confidence against a similarly tough opponent a week from now.


Arts & Entertainment

The Cult of Picasso
Pablo Picasso’s impact on the artists of the United States has never been underestimated, and a new exhibit at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art understands the enormity of the artist’s legacy. “Picasso and American Art,” originally curated by Michael FitzGerald for the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, is a dense and substantial exploration of Picasso’s influence upon American artists, even if it never strays far from its textbook leanings.

It’s Not Quite a Thriller, But ‘Zodiac’ Triumphs as an Engaging Mess
That David Fincher’s new film, “Zodiac,” is the first major Hollywood release made entirely through digital means without any tape mediary goes against the film’s entire fascination with paper trails, with tangible proof, with building knowledge. Its being is illusory. This isn’t a film about a serial killer and the terror he wrecked on the greater San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Rather, it’s a film about how knowledge and identity remain elusive, to the end, even in the face of what appears self-evident truth.

The Shame of ‘Grey’s Anatomy’
I’ve done something bad. Something shameful. Something that makes me feel dirty. And the evidence is all over the Internet.

Deflating the Oscars Hot Air Balloon
This year, the most shocking thing about the 79th Annual Academy Awards was no doubt Jack Nicholson’s fat, pale, bald head. A pageant like this should have some razzle dazzle but it seemed, in an effort to streamline, everything went, well, too smoothly.

Interview: Noise Pop Co-Founder Kevin Arnold
Noise Pop, the revered San Francisco indie festival, turns 14 this year. As the festival gears up for their first year with adjoining film and art shows, co-founder Kevin Arnold expressed his gratitude to the bands he loved that inspired him to start the festival, and his surprise at how his one-night local show in 1993 became one of the biggest West Coast festivals on the indie circuit.

White Space