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Monday, Aug 7, 2006
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Issue #1324 :: Monday, August 7, 2006

Top Headlines

Football
Deep Impact

When Tyler Fredrickson's third field-goal attempt in triple overtime sailed between the goal posts of Memorial Stadium on Sept. 27, 2003, the Cal football team seemed to have accomplished the impossible.

Pay Meetings Must Be Open, Court Rules
A judge has issued a ruling barring the UC Board of Regents compensation committee from meeting in private to make "collective decisions" on executive pay.

Column
My Letter to Rowling

It's incredible how emotionally invested we can become in the fate of fictional characters. One minute our favorite characters can be in the midst of a Quidditch match and the next minute they can be hurtling towards death, without warning, leaving us questioning how we can continue on with our lives as if they were never real to us.

Football
Starkey Offers Perspective on 2006 Campaign

If Joe Starkey had not been the radio announcer for the Cal football team for the 1982 Big Game, the contest would arguably not have been remembered in the same light that the six-lateral pass play that ended with Kevin Moehn crashing into a Stanford trombonist is now.

News

Pay Meetings Must Be Open, Court Rules
A judge has issued a ruling barring the UC Board of Regents compensation committee from meeting in private to make "collective decisions" on executive pay.

Businesses, Campus to Launch Joint Campaign
Campus officials and Telegraph Avenue merchants have partnered to launch a new marketing campaign geared toward drawing UC Berkeley students, staff and faculty to the iconic Berkeley street, which has suffered flagging sales in recent years.

Program To Expand Car Access
UC Berkeley students under age 21 will soon be able to rent cars by the hour through a new car sharing program slated to debut in September.

Science & Technology
Grant to Fund Collaboration in Cutting-Edge Research

UC Berkeley has secured a $16 million five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to study the emerging scientific field of synthetic biology, university officials announced last week.

Study Finds Gender Gap In Patenting
A recent study co-authored by a UC Berkeley researcher and sponsored by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation has found that female academic scientists patent their findings at about 40 percent the rate of their male counterparts.

Local Mothers Look to Reclaim World Record
Berkeley mothers gathered Thursday to make their first attempt at reclaiming Berkeley's world record for the most breastfeeding women in the same place at the same time.

A Call to Sever University Ties to Nuclear Research
The Circle of Concern, an anti-nuclear organization composed of Berkeley residents, holds a silent vigil to commemorate the 61st anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Obituary
Lecturer Promoted Hands-On Learning for Undergraduates

UC Berkeley astronomy senior lecturer emeritus David Cudaback passed away July 23 at age 77 after battling Parkinson's disease, leaving behind a legacy of creative coursework in the undergraduate astronomy program.

Obituary
Former Professor Defended Right to Academic Freedom

Eli Katz, whose political beliefs made him the focus of a loyalty oath dispute during the 1960s, died July 22 at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Berkeley after suffering his third stroke. He was 77.

News in Brief
Former Mayor Will Not Challenge Bates in Fall Vote

Correction
Thursday's article "Court Orders Schools to Pay Costs of Development" incorrectly stated that Irene Hegarty said the ruling would take UC Berkeley's relationship with the city to a new level. In fact, Hegarty said the ruling would not change the university's relationship with surrounding cities.


Sports

Football
Deep Impact

When Tyler Fredrickson's third field-goal attempt in triple overtime sailed between the goal posts of Memorial Stadium on Sept. 27, 2003, the Cal football team seemed to have accomplished the impossible.

Football
Starkey Offers Perspective on 2006 Campaign

If Joe Starkey had not been the radio announcer for the Cal football team for the 1982 Big Game, the contest would arguably not have been remembered in the same light that the six-lateral pass play that ended with Kevin Moehn crashing into a Stanford trombonist is now.

Baseball
Cal’s Satin Regaining Form in Cape Cod League

Last season was a tough one for many of the players expected to be stars for the Cal baseball team. However, none took a bigger fall from grace than junior third baseman Josh Satin.

Swimming
Silver Makes Successful Return at Nationals

Just five weeks ago, Emily Silver of the Cal women's swimming team broke her hand when she crashed into the wall at the Santa Clara Swim Meets. The junior had to take two weeks off before she could start training for the 2006 ConocoPhillips National Championships, which were held this week in Irvine, Calif.

Sports in Brief
After Pleading No Contest, QB Levy Rejoins Bears


Opinion

Column
My Letter to Rowling

It's incredible how emotionally invested we can become in the fate of fictional characters. One minute our favorite characters can be in the midst of a Quidditch match and the next minute they can be hurtling towards death, without warning, leaving us questioning how we can continue on with our lives as if they were never real to us.

Editorial
Lose the Litigation

Even though the city has healed one of the worst breaks in its relationship with UC Berkeley, a recent court ruling may give some agitators reason to open old wounds. For the sake of preserving a healthy town-gown relationship, we hope this is not the case.

Editorial
Time for Plan B

Recent behavior by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has once again confirmed that its decision-making-which should be based on science-has instead been infiltrated by politics. It's unfortunate that the FDA has attempted to sidestep the facts about the "morning-after pill," or Plan B, by halting approval of its over-the-counter sale to those over the age of 18.

Why I Won’t Run For Berkeley Mayor Again
First, I want to thank the many Berkeley residents who have indicated their support for me to enter the race for Mayor this November: particularly Merilee Mitchell who took out papers to gather signatures in-lieu of filing fees (even though I didn't know about it at the time). And to all of you who collected signatures, signed your names, sent me e-mails, called me, wrote me letters and stopped to talk to me in the grocery store, on the street or at various meetings, I am amazed and overwhelmed by the amount of your support which seems to be growing daily. Besides being greatly surprised by your numbers, I am deeply touched by your kind words, willingness to work for my candidacy and most of all by your enthusiastic encouragement. I am also humbled by the faith you have shown in my ability to resolve the many concerns that you have expressed.

Letters to the Editor
Columnist’s Argument Writes Off Common Good

John Waste's column ("Too Much Magic Bus, Aug. 3) makes a strong argument for his case that students, who do not ride the bus, should not have to pay for an AC Transit Class Pass, and that the users should pay the full $1.75 per use fare. The logic is compelling, but why limit the application? There are many university auxiliaries funded in part by student fees-the RSF for example-why should students, whose exercise is limited to pressing the remote buttons, subsidize those who vigorously work up the BO that Mr. Waste finds so offensive on public transport? Further, some are blessed with good health. Why should such fortunates subsidize the health service?

Editorial Cartoon by Kelly Tsou


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