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Monday, Aug 8, 2005
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Issue #1205 :: Monday, August 8, 2005

Top Headlines

Haas School to Receive $25 Million Donation
UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business is set to receive a $25 million donation as early as the end of the month, its largest alumnus donation to date, acting Dean Richard Lyons said Friday at the school's undergraduate orientation.

Speak of the Devil
Emily Dickinson had it all wrong. The prude was strung up on death and dying and wrote poems about driving around in a carriage with the Grim Reaper. Little did she know: Death is only the second-largest fear harbored by Americans today. Man, I bet she's rolling over in her grave right now-to think she didn't capitalize on the cool way "public speaking" rhymes with "rustic leaking."

Trojans Eclipse Cal, Pac-10 in Early Poll
LOS ANGELES-Though no longer the rags-to-riches story of recent years, the Cal football team is still a formidable force in the Pac-10 conference.

Solar Vehicle Gets Its Day in the Sun
The Beam Machine, UC Berkeley's one-man solar-powered car, finished second in its class-barely losing to Stanford University's "Solstice"-and 10th overall in last month's North American Solar Challenge.

News

Haas School to Receive $25 Million Donation
UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business is set to receive a $25 million donation as early as the end of the month, its largest alumnus donation to date, acting Dean Richard Lyons said Friday at the school's undergraduate orientation.

Solar Vehicle Gets Its Day in the Sun
The Beam Machine, UC Berkeley's one-man solar-powered car, finished second in its class-barely losing to Stanford University's "Solstice"-and 10th overall in last month's North American Solar Challenge.

Other Deals Could Follow Settlements in Enron Suit
The latest and largest settlement in the series of Enron Corp. securities fraud cases could pressure nearly a dozen remaining defendants named in the suit into brokering deals, according to lawyers for UC, the lead plaintiff in the class-action suit.

Campus to Extend Trademark Abroad
Shoppers in Asia and Europe can look forward to buying UC Berkeley merchandise without catching a flight to visit the campus.

Housing to Replace Extension Campus
UC will turn a former UC Berkeley Extension campus in San Francisco into 500 private housing units despite a competing proposal offered in June to use the six-acre block as a campus for the New College of California.

Neurobiologist Gets Grant for Research
UC Berkeley assistant professor Lu Chen will receive a research grant worth up to $1 million for her work in neurobiology, university officials announced Friday.

City's Public Works Director Resigns
After six years of running the city's infrastructure programs and developing a nationally recognized public works program, Rene Cardinaux stepped down from his post as Berkeley public works director Friday.

News in Brief
Summer Literacy Program to Become Permanent


Sports

Trojans Eclipse Cal, Pac-10 in Early Poll
LOS ANGELES-Though no longer the rags-to-riches story of recent years, the Cal football team is still a formidable force in the Pac-10 conference.

Tedford Year IV: A New (Instant) Hope
LOS ANGELES-Before he started for the Cincinnati Bengals, before he was selected as the first pick of the NFL Draft, before he became Mr. Heisman, Carson Palmer was simply a USC quarterback in the middle of what was to become a dream season.

Center Piece
SAN FRANCISCO-Marvin Philip is one guy who understands what a lot of his new teammates are going through.

Powe Back as Bears Pack for Italy Trip
The Cal men's basketball team is going on vacation.

Training Camp 2005: Quarterback Spot Up for Grabs As Cal Opens Camp
A quarterback position that is still up for grabs.

Field Hockey: Byrne Brings East Coast Mentality to Cal
There's something about hitting a ball with a crooked stick that Californians just don't understand.

Women's Golf: Sheridan Falls in First Round of U.S. Amateur
Cal women's golfer Sophia Sheridan could have spent all summer resting back home in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Sports in Brief
Draganja Leads Bears Contingent at Worlds


Opinion

Speak of the Devil
Emily Dickinson had it all wrong. The prude was strung up on death and dying and wrote poems about driving around in a carriage with the Grim Reaper. Little did she know: Death is only the second-largest fear harbored by Americans today. Man, I bet she's rolling over in her grave right now-to think she didn't capitalize on the cool way "public speaking" rhymes with "rustic leaking."

Editorial: Little Town, Big Ideas
Nothing spells anathema to Berkeley more than the word "corporation." So when Sharffen Berger Chocolate Maker Inc. announced it had sold itself to Hershey Co., many citizens' immediate fear was that the erstwhile independent chocolatier would fall victim to corporate cost- and quality-cutting. Still, though it's regrettable that yet another homegrown Berkeley business has been assimilated into the greater corporate Borg, Hershey has a definite interest in leaving Scharffen Berger well enough alone.

Editorial: Bookish Brouhaha
In a knee-jerk reaction to new technology, some Berkeley citizens are making a big fuss over the many dangers that could arise from making library checkout faster. The Berkeley Public Library is installing radio frequency identification devices in materials, which could improve efficiency at its branches by freeing up employees to help patrons in other ways. Though in light of pressing privacy issues citizens have a right to be wary, concerned Berkeleyans should think twice before condemning this new system on as yet unfounded fears.

The Healthcare Paradox in America
When you reach the point where both the haves (read: multinational corporations) and the have-nots (read: everyone else) are both complaining that healthcare will "lead them to bankruptcy," the issue ceases to be a problem and becomes a paradox.

Demilitarize UC, Democratize the Regents
On July 21, the UC Board of Regents voted to raise professional students' fees. They also heartily congratulated themselves for their recently-submitted bid to continue managing the nuclear weapons laboratory at Los Alamos. What's the connection? While UC Regent David Lee did farcically suggest that revenue from lab management be used to offset student fees, the truth is that in both decisions, the regents totally ignored the voices of students.

The Best Place for Dissent
Last week, right-wingers made a fuss because my painting of the United States going down the toilet sat in the California Attorney General's building in Sacramento. The painting, "T'anks to Mr. Bush," is one of many pieces displayed in an art exhibition sponsored by the California Lawyers for the Arts. The exhibition will remain at the Attorney General's office until the end of August.

Letters to the Editor
I would like inform your readers about the National Youth Rights Association's voting age demonstration on Tuesday, July 12 in Berkeley to raise public awareness of a proposed ballot initiative to lower the voting age to 17 for school board elections in Berkeley. While the number of people that attended-eight-was slim, we got a fair amount of reporters. It was a learning experience. I hope that more people show interest in the next one (in early October).

Editorial Cartoon by Jessica Chan


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