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Tuesday, May 31, 2005
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Issue #1183 :: Tuesday, May 31, 2005

Top Headlines

Privacy Bites the Plastic
Are you wearing a hat? Are you bald? Do you experience heightened levels of progesterone during certain times of the month? It's no wonder that games like "Guess Who?" target players under the age of 10-it takes a juvenile mind to identify people by ocular paraphernalia. But after we grow out of overalls and put away the Super Soakers, big boys and girls don't use such superficial features to categorize individuals, right?

Crew Captures National Title
Everyone remembers hearing the story of the turtle and the hare as a child.

Regents Delay Vote On Latest Fee Hikes
SAN FRANCISCO-Potential fee hikes for UC professional students were put on hold after the UC Board of Regents pushed back the final vote following a round of heavy debate Thursday.

Editorial: Good Call, Bad Reason
It's embarrassing that each of the Berkeley High School students presenting a proposal at the City Council last Tuesday were much more eloquent than the average adult who makes his case there. The students made a clear and powerful point to consider an initiative that would let citizens decide on lowering the voting age to 16. While the council was wise to reject the motion-even if it did pass, the initiative would be a moot point, since the county has ultimate jurisdiction-its reasons for not accepting it were amusing at best.

News

Regents Delay Vote On Latest Fee Hikes
SAN FRANCISCO-Potential fee hikes for UC professional students were put on hold after the UC Board of Regents pushed back the final vote following a round of heavy debate Thursday.

UC Joins Race for Los Alamos Lab
SAN FRANCISCO-The UC Board of Regents voted Thursday to formally enter what is now a head-to-head competition for management of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in an effort to continue UC's 63-year hold on the nuclear weapons research facility.

UC Berkeley Leads Pact to Reshape News
Charging that journalism has failed at some of its most basic tasks, deans of five of the nation's top journalism schools announced that they will jointly run a three-year, $6 million project based at UC Berkeley to improve the quality of training in the field.

Campus Official to Serve As Judge on Reality Show
Having been promised that there would be no worm-eating, UC Berkeley outreach officer Marquesa Lawrence auditioned for and accepted the role of a judge on ABC's new reality series "The Scholar," set to premiere June 6.

Budget Cuts Threaten Humanities Classes
Although UC Berkeley is beginning to adjust to years of consistent state cuts, the university's arts and humanities departments are still reeling from reductions in discussion sections.

Corrections
The May 16 sports article "Visco Clinches Women's Upset of No. 9 Miami" incorrectly stated that the Cal women's tennis team won against No. 9 Florida. In fact, they won against No. 9 Miami.

Donors Step Up As State Checks Out
UC raked in more than $1 billion in private donations in 2004 for the fifth straight year, but university officials say that a lack of state support will force them to raise even more.

News in Brief
Cal Olympic Gold Medalist, CIA Agent Dies At 79


Sports

Crew Captures National Title
Everyone remembers hearing the story of the turtle and the hare as a child.

Bears Finish Year in Bittersweet Fashion
Rather than dousing one another with celebratory champagne courtesy of an NCAA Tournament bid, the Cal baseball players will likely be shipping their cases across the Bay to Sunken Diamond.

Bears Again Beat Back Elimination
Cal may have settled for sharing the Pac-10 championship this season, but it outright leads the universe in making fans sweat.

Bounced From the Bubble
I wasn't sure how to best describe yesterday's announcement of the 64 teams that made the 2005 NCAA Division I baseball tournament, so I consulted a writer's most trusted resource, the dictionary.

Niland, Briaud Handed Early Exit at NCAAs
Patrick Briaud and Conor Niland of the Cal men's tennis team headed to College Station, Texas last week for the individual NCAA tournament with a bundle of accolades and expectations.

Babos' Loss Ends Mixed Year
The performance of the Bears' No. 8 freshman star Suzi Babos, in the 2005 NCAA Championships individual tournament fell short of expectations, as did, to a certain extent, the season of the No. 24 Cal women's tennis team.

Sports in Brief
Relay Teams Advance to NCAA Championships


Opinion

Privacy Bites the Plastic
Are you wearing a hat? Are you bald? Do you experience heightened levels of progesterone during certain times of the month? It's no wonder that games like "Guess Who?" target players under the age of 10-it takes a juvenile mind to identify people by ocular paraphernalia. But after we grow out of overalls and put away the Super Soakers, big boys and girls don't use such superficial features to categorize individuals, right?

Editorial: Good Call, Bad Reason
It's embarrassing that each of the Berkeley High School students presenting a proposal at the City Council last Tuesday were much more eloquent than the average adult who makes his case there. The students made a clear and powerful point to consider an initiative that would let citizens decide on lowering the voting age to 16. While the council was wise to reject the motion-even if it did pass, the initiative would be a moot point, since the county has ultimate jurisdiction-its reasons for not accepting it were amusing at best.

Editorial: Resorting to Old Tactics
Irony can be amusing, but not when it pinches professional student pockets. The UC Board of Regents likely vote to increase professional student fees by over $1,000 in order to pay for a lawsuit that was filed because the university had raised student fees.

PATRIOT Act Has Major Advantages
In the wake of the horrific events of 9/11, Congress enacted the PATRIOT Act, giving federal law enforcement important tools to combat terrorism. These have been indispensable in protecting Americans while preserving liberties the Constitution guarantees us. But at the end of 2005, a number of the act's most important provisions are scheduled to "sunset." I hope these 16 provisions are made permanent, ensuring that all the necessary legal tools remain available to law enforcement.

City Council Sells Out to UC Berkeley-In Secret
The Berkeley City Council, strong-armed by Mayor Tom Bates and the City Attorney, has held a series of secret meetings and secret votes about a secret document, culminating on May 24 when the Council secretly met and finally voted on a secret final document.

Editorial Cartoon by Wendy Trinh


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