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Thursday, Sep 23, 2004
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Issue #1018 :: Thursday, September 23, 2004

Top Headlines

Council OKs Removal of Some Phone Poles
The Berkeley City Council voted unanimously on Tuesday to remove street telephone poles from the Thousand Oaks neighborhood and 7-1 to create a quota on medical marijuana dispensaries.

National Holdout League
A week ago, one of Canada's most popular American institutions came quietly to a halt. The National Hockey League officially entered into a lockout, as the NBA did in 1998 and Major League Baseball in 1994-95. At this rate, the NFL is due for a stoppage of play in about 2010-just a few years into what will prove to be the illustrious careers of Aaron Rodgers and J.J. Arrington.

Bears Dig in for Pac-10 Start
If the entire Pac-10 season can be viewed as an epic battle, the No. 16 Cal volleyball team's opening match against Arizona State could be considered a skirmish.

Beastie Boys II Men
Rarely do graying, portly, middle-aged men respond to requests for some action from the back section.

News

Council OKs Removal of Some Phone Poles
The Berkeley City Council voted unanimously on Tuesday to remove street telephone poles from the Thousand Oaks neighborhood and 7-1 to create a quota on medical marijuana dispensaries.

Haas Maintains Top-20 Ranking
UC Berkeley's Haas Business School held onto its 15th place ranking among the nation's top schools in a Wall Street Journal report released yesterday.

Governor Allows Over-the-Counter Needle Sales
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed into law on Monday a bill allowing over-the-counter sales of hypodermic needles, while shooting down another that would have made it easier for local governments to allow the distribution of clean needles.

Berkeley Is Haven for Teenage Health, Study Finds
Berkeley is the most "teen healthy" city in California, according to a state study released yesterday.

Regents Deliberate Future of Labs
SAN FRANCISCO-The UC Board of Regents met yesterday to debate whether UC should put up a fight for stewardship of their three national laboratories.

Panel Voices Views on Security
Controversial UC Berkeley law professor John Yoo said in a panel discussion yesterday that there was little difference between President Bush and Sen. John Kerry's campaigns on national security, a key theme in this season's election.

News in Brief
City Council Creates New Fire Department Position


Sports

Bears Dig in for Pac-10 Start
If the entire Pac-10 season can be viewed as an epic battle, the No. 16 Cal volleyball team's opening match against Arizona State could be considered a skirmish.

Women's Golf: Wedged Within the Field
Put 105 of the nation's top golfers on a short track and anyone will agree that the outcome will be determined by the short game.

Men's Soccer: Brown, Broncos Battle Bears
After mowing down teams on the green blades of Edwards Stadium, the No. 4 Cal men's soccer team hit the road to try to cut down the opposition elsewhere.

Sports in Brief
Men's Water Polo Game Postponed to Mourn Cutino


Arts & Entertainment

Beastie Boys II Men
Rarely do graying, portly, middle-aged men respond to requests for some action from the back section.

Exploring Byron Kim: Fourteen Years of Adjusting the Abstract
Byron Kim is the type who slips unnoticed into a herded crowd of students and patrons on tour of his exhibition. He is also one who, during his lecture on his pieces, stands to one side of the theater and speaks in an unhurried, morse-code monotone, occasionally broken by excited inflection.

Zombies ate my scones
The notion of a zombie movie parody is a bit unappealing. Already satires of modern society, the genre is based upon the bedfellows of fear and laughs-an oozing, collapsing face can keep you up at night for years, or it can provide a momentary chuckle depending on the circumstances. Even the primarily serious zombie numbers, such as the recent "28 Days Later," utilize such bombastic techniques that even the most dire moments retain an aire of slapstick.

Taster's Choice: Find Waldo, Yet Again
It's hard to imagine someone who didn't read Martin Handford's "Where's Waldo?" books as a child. The striped, spectacled Ubermensch of the picture book world was always ridiculously simple to find, but the fact that he was always there provided a warm, fuzzy, backhanded feeling of companionship that Tetris just didn't provide.

Bullets Over Broderick
The Last Shot" is a film about what Hollywood loves most-itself. First time director/established writer Jeff Nathanson set out to make a witty self–reflective film that tries to mocks the industry a la "Get Shorty," "State and Main" and "The Player." Despite the clever one–liners and smart dialogue, Nathanson's brainchild is too unfocused and too sloppy to actually be the biting satire that it strives to be.

Abandon the Crafty Cheese for Some Real Meat
The celebrity interview. Whether on television or print, this trite convention arises as a vain attempt to plug and subsequently sustain the lifestyle of that chosen few. Oh, but the group we herald are so ultimately flawed, and National Public Radio's Fresh Air host, Terry Gross exercises a habit of exposing this to her listeners on a regular basis. Luckily, she's decided to publish the transcripts so that those of us that missed the live broadcasts can catch most of what we missed.

Online Exclusive: Period Drama Keeps Head Firmly Planted In Clouds
The best reason for going to see "Head in the Clouds" is simply to use it as an example of all that can go horribly wrong with a well-intentioned period melodrama. Now advertising Charlize Theron as an Academy Award Winner, there is anticipation for her performance to be just as ripe with complexity as her works in Monster and The Cider House Rules. Unfortunately the title rings a little too true, because not only do the characters have their heads in the clouds, but it seems the writer/director John Duigan does as well.

Interview: Chitra and Cody's Books Reunited
As a UC Berkeley student, Chitra Divakaruni once sat in the front row of Cody's Bookstore on Telegraph to listen with wonder and awe at what authors had to say. Now the tables have turned, and Divakaruni comes to Cody's not as a student but as a guest speaker.

Online Exclusive: "The Forgotten"s Plot Apparently Forgotten
It's a coin toss as to whether "The Forgotten" is one of the most aptly named movies of the year, or not. A thriller starring Julianne Moore and Dominic West, "The Forgotten" is a story about a woman who is told that the son she thinks she had, who died in a plane crash, never actually existed. The people around her think she is insane, and she cannot understand why she is the only person to remember that her son existed. This is one way in which the title is accurate.

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