Issues

This Issue
Thursday, Sep 9, 2004
Next Issue
Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008
(SI:Spring Orientation)
Search this issue:

Issue #1004 :: Thursday, September 9, 2004

Top Headlines

Oppression of the Lefties
For as long as I can remember, I have been oppressed. As far back as kindergarten, when an entire classroom of children was being taught how to hold a pencil and write correctly, I sat in the corner, mocked and ridiculed because the rubber guides slipped onto the necks of the pencils were made for right-handed tots, while I, alas, used my left.

Cal Drops First NorPac Game
If there is one thing that has been the trademark of Shellie Onstead's tenure as coach of the Cal field hockey team, it is that the Bears dominate Northern Pacific Conference (NorPac) play.

Felled Power Line Forces Thousands from Homes
Thousands of students were forced to evacuate their Southside homes last night after an overheated power line fell atop a car parked on Piedmont Avenue.

We're Mad as Hatters Here
A tragically hip folk tale of the macabre, the American Conservatory Theater's production of "The Black Rider" delivers a classic story about the evils of ambition set in a replendent world of the surreal. With spectacular lighting, uber-cool costuming and a staggeringly beautiful musical score by none other than musical madman/genius Tom Waits, this over-the-top wunderland of the dark and delicious is a not to be missed event.

News

List of Fee Hikes Has UC Berkeley Near Top
UC Berkeley is close to topping a list of fee increases in 67 public universities-placing third for highest fee increase over the past two years in an annual USA Today survey.

Regent Cited for Poor Attendance Record Resigns
UC Regent Haim Saban, who has come under heavy fire for his poor attendance record, stepped down from the UC Board of Regents yesterday.

New Majors, Minor Synthesize Disciplines
Senior citizens are rarely labeled "disabled," even if they suffer from debilitating health problems-more often than not, they are considered simply elderly. This anomaly is one of the many topics that could be explored if a new disabilities studies minor is implemented next semester.

Nader's Running Mate Slams Both Parties
Peter Camejo, running mate of independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader, tore into the two-party American political system and sharply criticized both major presidential candidates in an appearance at Wheeler Auditorium yesterday afternoon.

Attorney General Joins E-Voting Suit
California Attorney General Bill Lockyer announced Tuesday that his office will join a pair of independent plaintiffs in a false claims lawsuit against Diebold Election Systems, the company supplying California's electronic voting machines.

News in Brief
New In-Pavement Lamp to Light Up Southside Life

Michelle Malkin Defends Racial Profiling in Speech
Drawing more than 250 people to Dwinelle Hall last night, syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin took an unconventional stance in her speech as she justified America's Japanese internment policy and post-Sept.11 racial profiling practices.

Felled Power Line Forces Thousands from Homes
Thousands of students were forced to evacuate their Southside homes last night after an overheated power line fell atop a car parked on Piedmont Avenue.


Sports

Pac-10 Notebook: Beavers Lose Heartbreaker
• After its kicker missed three point-after attempts, Oregon State fell to defending co-national champion Louisiana State 21-22 in overtime.

Cal Drops First NorPac Game
If there is one thing that has been the trademark of Shellie Onstead's tenure as coach of the Cal field hockey team, it is that the Bears dominate Northern Pacific Conference (NorPac) play.

Streaking Bears Poised to Defend Lair
The number eight appears to carry a special significance for the No. 8 Cal volleyball team as it enters the Golden Bear Invitational this weekend at Haas Pavilion.

In Training for Invite, Coach Gets Political
He may not be running for office anytime soon, but for all intents and purposes, the coach of the Cal women's soccer team seems to be one of the best politicians in collegiate soccer.


Arts & Entertainment

We're Mad as Hatters Here
A tragically hip folk tale of the macabre, the American Conservatory Theater's production of "The Black Rider" delivers a classic story about the evils of ambition set in a replendent world of the surreal. With spectacular lighting, uber-cool costuming and a staggeringly beautiful musical score by none other than musical madman/genius Tom Waits, this over-the-top wunderland of the dark and delicious is a not to be missed event.

Dream Theatre
Chances are you have never before heard of San Francisco's Xenodrome. Most likely, after walking a mile from the BART station through a residential neighborhood, to come to an apartment building, with nothing more than an 8 x 10 flier to assure you this is the right place, you may begin to feel uncomfortable. Quite possibly, you may question the meaning of life. Well, that was my frame of mind going into the play "Victim of a Mind Trap." However, after my fears subsided, I was treated to an enjoyable performance of a play written, directed, starred in, produced, and promoted by Cal sophomore Eric Barry. The play focuses on the possibility of exploring one's deepest fantasies, effectively blurring the line between dream and reality.

‘Rabbit' Doesn't Resonate
I didn't have to wait long for the action to unfold in Larry Brown's novel "The Rabbit Factory," now out in paperback. The novel opens with prostitutes, gangsters and random shootings. The bizarre cast of characters caught my attention for a few chapters, but failed to hold that attention.

Taster's Choice: One Track Mind
I am often taunted about my CD collection. Not for its remnants of prepubescent foolishness as evidenced by Backstreet Boy middle school castoffs, but because it is overwhelmingly composed of ... soundtracks.

Hold the Phone
You know there's something wrong with a film when the audience feels more sympathy for a goldfish than the imperiled heroine.

Foreseeing Death: A Truly Weird Science
Now, admittedly, I haven't seen an episode of "The Dead Zone," a USA Network show based on Stephen King's novel of the same name-thankfully, that is why network websites and research skills are invaluable! '80s favorite Anthony Michael Hall stars as Johnny Smith, a man possessing psychic abilities to see both past and future events via touch, a skill he acquires after waking from a deep six-year coma.

Online Exclusive: Prison Memoir Frustratingly Impregnable
Joe Loya's "The Man Who Outgrew His Prison Cell, Confessions of a Bank Robber," the autobiography of a minister's son who eventually robbed more than 30 banks and spent seven years in prison, is a classic case of substance over style.

Online Exclusive: ‘Evergreen' a Mix of the Bittersweet and Bland
"Evergreen" is the kind of film that easily garners high expectations. A convincing trailer combined with a Grand Jury Prize nomination at Sundance lend this film high credentials, yet they carry little significance since ultimately Enid Zentelis's cinematic debut fails to achieve the poignancy it tries in vain to attain.

White Space